Newsletter excerpts: 10 New Studies on foot pain issues--April 2021

Posted by: Michelle Burns
Date Posted: April 16, 2021

Here is some of the information I recently shared in the April newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This newsletter is focused on foot and ankle pain and plantar fasciitis. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, which include links to the studies as well as special offers and sales coupons, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Increasing ankle dorsiflexion range of motion
  2. Comparing Active release and Positional release for Gastrosoleus trigger point release
  3. Correlation between Gastrocnemius tightness and heel pain
  4. Effect of upward toe springs on walking biomechanics
  5. Comparing Botulinum Toxin A, Corticosteroid, and anesthetic injection for plantar fasciitis
  6. Effect of foam roller on pain and ankle range of motion
  7. Comparing adjuvant low-dye kinesio taping, sham taping, or extracorporeal shockwave therapy
  8. Comparing muscle energy technique versus ischemic compression on pain and disability
  9. Effect of myofascial release with lower limb strengthening on plantar fasciitis
  10. Dry needling effectiveness for plantar heel pain
  11.  Exploration of Valgus, Varus, Vargus

STUDIES and ARTICLES

1. An article titled Strategies to increase ankle dorsiflexion range of motion by Drs. Howe, Waldron, North, and Bampouras reviews exercise-based strategies to restore ankle dorsiflexion range of motion.

2.  A study titled Comparison of Active Release Technique and Positional Release Therapy for Gastrosoleus Trigger Point Release in Recreational Runners, published in International Journal of Health Sciences and Research in July 2020, concludes: Positional Release Therapy is a better intervention for the release of trigger points as it shows a greater increase in ankle dorsiflexion range of motion and a significant reduction in pain.

3. A study titled Correlation Between Gastrocnemius Tightness and Heel Pain Severity in Plantar Fasciitis, published in Foot & Ankle International in Sept 2020 concludes: a strong, statistically significant correlation between gastrocnemius tightness and the severity of heel pain in plantar fasciitis.

4. An intriguing study titled Effect of the upward curvature of toe springs on walking biomechanics in humans, published in Scientific Reports in Sept 2020 found: although most features of modern footwear have been intensively studied, there has been almost no research on the effects of toe springs. This nearly ubiquitous upward curvature of the sole at the front of the shoe elevates the toe box dorsally above the ground and thereby holds the toes in a constantly dorsiflexed  position. While it is generally recognized that toe springs facilitate the forefoot’s ability to roll forward at the end of stance, toe springs may also have some effect on natural foot function. Our results help explain why toe springs have been a pervading feature in shoes for centuries but also suggest that toe springs may contribute to weakening of the foot muscles and possibly to increased susceptibility to common pathological conditions such as plantar fasciitis. 

5. A study titled Comparison of Botulinum Toxin A, Corticosteroid, and Anesthetic Injection for Plantar Fasciitis, published in Foot & Ankle International, concluded: no significant differences between treatment groups were observed. The pain relief and functional improvement obtained with the different treatments was maintained during the 6-month follow-up.

6. A study. titled Immediate effect of foam roller on pain and ankle range of motion in patients with plantar fasciitis: A randomized controlled trial, published in Hong Kong Physiotherapy Journal in Oct 2020, concluded: both stretching and foam rolling techniques helped in reducing pain and increasing the ROM. However, the effectiveness of foam roller was superior to stretching in terms of increase in pressure pain thresholds at gastrocnemius and soleus.

7. A study titled Effects of Adjuvant Low-dye kinesio taping, adjuvant sham taping, or extracorporeal shockwave therapy alone in plantar fasciitis: a randomized double-blind controlled trial, published in Europe PMC in Nov 2020, concludes: Low-dye KT, in addition to ESWT is more effective than sham-taping and ESWT in pain relief and foot function improvement at a 4-week follow-up.

8.  A study titled Effect of muscle energy technique versus ischemic compression on pain and disability in patients with plantar fasciitis, published in International Journal of Physiology, Nutrition and Physical Education in 2020 concluded:  both the muscle energy technique and ischemic compression were individually effective in improving the flexibility and strength. While comparing both techniques there is no significant difference present between the groups.

9. A study titled Effect of myofascial release with lower limb strengthening on plantar fasciitis, published in International Journal of Physical Education, Sports and Health in 2021 concludes: myofascial release is significantly effective when given with lower limb strengthening programs for reducing pain and improving the functional status in subjects with plantar fasciitis.

10. A study titled Is Dry Needling effective for the management of plantar heel pain or plantar fasciitis? An updated systematic review and meta-analysis published in Pain Medicine in Mar 2021 concluded: moderate to low evidence suggests a positive effect of TrP dry needling for improving pain intensity and pain-related disability in patients with plantar heel pain of musculoskeletal origin at short- and long-term, respectively.

TIDBITS and RESOURCES

REFERENCE

A great article, by Whitney Lowe, titled Valgus, Varus, Vargus…What is it? in Nov 2015, covers a very understandable definition of these joint dysfunctions and what they can cause.

© 2020 Advanced Holistic Healing Arts 
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