Here is some of the information I recently shared in the October newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This newsletter is focused on foot pain and plantar fasciitis. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, which include links to the studies as well as special offers and sales coupons, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Comparing toe separators and insoles in hallux valgus treatment
  2. Effect of Local Percutaneous radiofrequency for chronic plantar fasciitis
  3. Comparing stretching exercise and high-load strengtheing exercise
  4. Acute Kinetic and Kinematic differences between minimalist sandal, shod and barefoot running
  5. Comparing intralesional platelet rich plasma injection and extracorporeal shockwave therapy
  6. Functional evaluation and pain symptomatology or foot and ankle in severely obese
  7. Comparing splinting, exercise, and electrotherapy in hallux valgus
  8. Comparing phonophoresis and myofascial release in plantar fasciitis
  9. Comparing plantar fascia stretch and moist heat heel pad

The impact of anti-cancer treatment on feet

The Foot Tripod

STUDIES and ARTICLES

1. A study titled Comparison between the plantar pressure effects of toe separators and insoles in patients with hallux valgus at a one-month follow-up, published in Foot and Ankle Surgery Feb 2021, looked at the difference between prefabricated toe separators or customized insole. The study concluded: After one month of use, the customized insole was more effective in plantar pressure reduction than the toe separator for a hallux deformity.

2.  An article, titled Local Percutaneous Radiofrequency for Chronic Plantar Fasciitis, published in Arthroscopy Techniques in May 2021, compared the use of bipolar radio frequency treatment with open surgery and concludes: Bipolar radiofrequency appears to be a safe procedure for refractory plantar fasciitis that can provide outcomes equivalent to open plantar fascia release with less morbidity.

3. A study titled Physiotherapy Approach to Patients with Chronic Plantar Fasciitis: Comparison of the Effects of Specific Stretching Exercise and High-Load Strengthening Exercise, published in Journal of the Korean Society of Integrative Medicine in Sept 2021 compared Extracorporeal shock wave therapy combined with daily plantar-specific stretching with extracorporeal shock wave therapy and high-load progressive strength exercise every other day. The study concludes: the high-load strengthening exercise consisting of the progressive exercise protocol resulted in superior results after 12 weeks compared with plantar-specific stretching.

4. A small study, performed as a part of a Master’s Thesis at Stellenbosch University, titled Acute Kinetic and Kinematic Differences between Minimalist Sandal, Shod, and Barefoot Running in Habitually Shod Male Recreational Trail Runners, concludes: minimalist running simulates barefoot running. Vertical load rates may be higher in a barefoot and minimalist sandal condition during the initial transition period because of a lack of kinematic changes at the knee.

5. A study titled A comparative study between intralesional platelet rich plasma injection and extracorporeal shockwave therapy for the treatment of plantar fasciitis, published in Journal of Arthroscopy and Joint Surgery in Sept 2021, concludes:Both autologous Platelet Rich  Plasma and extracorporeal shock wave therapy can become extremely useful modalities for management of recalcitrant cases of plantar fasciitis with no known adverse effects.

6. A study, titled Functional evaluation and pain symptomatology of the foot and ankle in individuals with severe obesity—controlled transversal study, published in Rev Bras Ortop (Sao Paulo) in Apr 2021, concludes: the incidence of foot pain was higher in the group of severely obese patients (BMI >40) compared with the control group. According to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society scale, functional forefoot, mid foot, and hind foot performance was worse in severely obese individuals.

7. A study titled A comparison of the effectiveness of splinting, exercise, and electrotherapy in women patients with hallux valgus: A randomized clinical trial, published in The Foot in Sept 2021, concludes:
    Conservative treatment methods improve foot function in patients with mild to moderate Hallux Valgus
    Splinting was more effective than exercise and electrotherapy in the management of Hallux Valgus.
    A combination of splinting, exercise and electrotherapy may be more beneficial to improve Hallux Valgus symptoms.

8. A study titled Effect of phonophoresis and myofascial release in plantar fasciitis, published in Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics in 2021 concludes: phonophoresis was found to be more helpful than myofacial release in lowering pain and improving functional status.

9.  A study titled A comparative study to analyze the effect of plantar fascia stretch and heel pad with moist heat in the patients of plantar fasciitis, published in Global Journal of Medical and Clinical Short Communications in Aug 2021, concludes: plantar fascia stretch has more significant effect on plantar fasciitis than heel pad with moist heat.

TIDBITS, UPDATES, and RESOURCES

REFERENCE

  1. An article, found at iocp.org.uk, titled The Impact of Anti-cancer treatment on feet by Afni Shah-Hamilton in spring 2021, is a great reference on the effects of chemotherapy on the feet and how those challenges may be treated.                                                     
  2. A great facebook post, by Michael Mcaleese, titled The Foot Tripod shows the importance of standing on the whole foot, not just the heel or toes.

Here is some of the information I recently shared in the September newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This newsletter is focused on fascia, myofascia, and trigger points. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, which include links to the studies as well as special offers and sales coupons, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Dry needling vs trigger point manual therapy for myofascial pain
  2. Scalene Trigger Points: The Great Imitators
  3. Dry needling vs dry needling with intramuscular electrical stimulation
  4. Dry needling decreases hamstring tightness
  5. Positional release therapy for the treatment of upper TRapezius trigger points
  6. Effect of ice massage with integrated nauromuscular inhibition technique
  7. Kinesio Tape on fascia for muscle activity
  8. Suboccipital muscle inhibition technique on hamstring tightness
  9. Iliacus trigger point release affects angle of anterior pelvic tilt
  10. Comparison of ischemic compression therapy vs deep friction massage for trigger points.

STUDIES and ARTICLES

1. A article titled Comparison of dry needling and trigger point manual therapy in patients with neck and upper back myofascial pain syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis, published in Sep 2020 in Journal of Manual and Manipulative Therapy, concludes: both dry needling and trigger point manual therapy improve pain and function in the short to medium term. Neither is more superior than the other.

2.  An excellent review article titled Scalene Trigger Points: The Great Imitators by Donald Murphy in Dynamic Chiropractic, explains the different types of manifestation of active trigger points in the scalene muscles.

3. A study titled Rate and maintenance of improvement of myofascial pain with dry needling alone vs dry needling with intramuscular electrical stimulation: a randomized controlled trial, published in Sep 2020 in Journal of Manual & Manipulative Therapy concludes: dry needling and dry needling with intramuscular electrical stiumlation demonstrated improvement and maintenance in disability and pain for 6 weeks. No differences in improvement of disability or pain existed between the groups at week 6 or 12.

4. A study titled Dry needling for hamstring flexibility: A single-blind randomized controlled trial, published in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation in Oct 2020 concludes: Dry needling is effective in improving hamstring flexibility compared with static stretching. One session of dry needling can be an effective treatment for hamstring tightness and increasing flexibility.

5. A study titled Positional release therapy for the treatment of upper Trapezius trigger points, published in Clinical Images and Case Report Journal in Oct 2020, concludes: Positional release therapy was found to be effective in the treatment of upper Trapezius trigger points as it significantly increases cervical reange of motion and reduction of pain.

6. A study titled Effect of ice massage with integrated neuromuscular inhibition technique on pain and function in subjects with mechanical neck pain: randomized controlled trial, publsihed in Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy in Nov 2020, concludes: ice massage and integrated neuromuscular inhibition technique are effective methods in managing active trigger points in the upper Trapezius of person having mechnical neck pain without statistically significant difference.

7. A study titled Kinesio tape for Fascia on Trunk Muscle Activity during Plank, published in Oct 2020 in J For Phys Ther, concludes: K applying on the fasciaw of trageted muscle increases the muscle activity. Therefore, we cna also focus on the fascia to increase muscle activities, not only on muscles.

8. A study titled Effect of Suboccipital Muscle Inhibition Technique on Hamstring Tightness in Healthy Adults-An Interventional Study, published in Oct 2020 compared suboccipital muscle inhibition technique and static stretching to static stretching along. The study concludes: suboccipital muscle inhibition technique is effective in improving flexibiliyt of hamstring muscle.

9.  A study titled Evaluation of the impact of ilacus trigger points on angle of pelvic inclination in healthy individuals, published in Nov 2016 and presented at the Global Physiotherapy Congress in Florida by Emil Mete of Istanbul Medeniyet University, was focused on the effect of the Iliacus trigger point on the angle of anterior pelvic tilt. The study concludes: after iliacus trigger point release a significant decrease was found in the angle of anterior pelvic tilt, a decrease was found in the Thomas test, and an increase was found in pain pressure threshold.10.  A study titled Comparison between effects of ischemic compression therapy and deep friction massage therapy for trigger points in neck and upper back, published in Jun 2020 in JRCRS, concludes: ...ischemic compression is more effective than deep friction massage in patients with MTrP's in the neck and upper back for decreasing pain and disability, but for increasing cervical ROM, both therapuetic approaches are equally useful.

10.  A study titled Comparison between effects of ischemic compression therapy and deep friction massage therapy for trigger points in neck and upper back, pubnlished in Jun 2020 in JRCRS concludes: ...ischemic compression is more effective than deep friction massage in patients with MTrP's in the neck and upper back for decreasing pain and disability, but for increasing cervical ROM, both therapuetic approaches are equally useful.

Here is some of the information I recently shared in my October newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This month is focused on fascia, myofascia, and trigger points. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Why we don't elongate fascia
  2. New scientific data about active trigger points
  3. Myofascial release enhances wound healing
  4. Fascia microtrauma may contribute to DOMS
  5. Attenuation of postoperative adhesions using manual therapy
  6. Iliotibial band pain in the runner
  7. Effects of C-section and vaginal delivery on abdominal muscles and fascia
  8. Comparison of Neuromuscular inhibition and ischemic compression
  9. Comparison of 3 different manual therapeutic techniques
  10. Comparison of Active Release technique vs Positional release for trigger points

RESOURCES

  1. VIDEO: The Secret Life of fascia official trailer
  2. VIDEO: What is fascia?
  3. BOOK: Fascia: What it is and why it matters
  4. BOOK: Anatomy, Bony pelvis, and lower limb fascia lata

STUDIES and ARTICLES

I receive a weekly update on anything published on the internet that includes information about fascia, myofascia, manual therapy, and trigger points.  I try to glean the best of the information and provide a brief synopsis of the information. If you come across any information that you think would be good to share, please also feel free to pass that information along to: info@holistichealingarts.net


1. A blog article, titled Why We Don’t Elongate Facia (pt 2) by Whitney Lowe investigates the idea of fascial manipulation focusing on the force applied to the skin to create an effect on fascia.

2.  A blog article, titled New Scientific Data to Revisit Active Trigger Points Concept by Ross Turchaninov includes images of trigger points and some additional theories.

3. A blog article, titled Modeled Myofascial Release Enhances Wound Healing in Bioengineered Tendons through Fibroblast Proliferation and Collagen Remodeling on Fascia & Fitness summarizes a study published in Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics and suggests that “MFR results in improved wound healing due to increased fibroblast deposition and collagen density within and adjacent to the wound area.”

4. A blog article titled Fascia micro-trauma may contribute to DOMS on Fascia & Fitness show that DOMS was associated with the increased sensitivity of muscle fascia to the stimulus, suggesting the source of pain is fascia (connective tissue) rather than the muscle fibers themselves.

5. A study titled Attenuation of postoperative adhesions using a modeled manual therapy, published at PLOS ONE in 2017 concludes: Modeled Manual Therapy initiated immediately postoperatively is an effective preventive for cohesive postoperative adhesions and includes a video of the technique performed.

6. A blog article titled Iliotibial Band Pain in the Runner Part 2: Treatment by Rich Willy suggests: Foam rolling does not result in changes in flexibility that last more than just a few minutes and any pain relief experienced by foam rolling is temporary, likely due to temporary central pain modulation. Contrary to popular opinion, “adhesions” or “myofasciae” are not being “released” or “broken up” by foam rolling. Considering ITB pain is a compression injury, it makes little sense to add further compression o the lateral knee anyway. Instead of foam rolling, purposively target running-specific loads.

7. A study, titled Effects of Cesarean Section and Vaginal Delivery on Abdominal Muscles and Fasciae, published in Medicina Apr 2020 concludes: transverse Cesarean Section women showed significant alterations in both abdominal fasciae and muscle thicknesses, whereas vaginal delivery women showed alterations mainly in muscles. Thinner Rectus abdominus and/or dissymmetric Internal oblique, wider inter-rectus distance, and thicker loose connective tissue and abdominal perimuscular fasciae after Cesarean section may cause muscle deficits and alteration of fascial gliding, which may induce scar, abdominal, low back, and/or pelvic pain.

8. A study titled, Effect of Integrated Neuromuscular Inhibition Technique versus Ischaemic Compression and Trigger Point Pressure Release on Upper Trapezius and Non-Specific Neck Pain in IOSR Journal of Nursing and Health Science, 2019 concludes: Integrated neuromuscular inhibition technique and ischemic compression and trigger point pressure release are equally effective in reducing pain and neck disability index and improving range of motion.

9. A study titled Change in hamstrings flexibility: A comparison between three different manual therapeutic techniques in normal individuals, published in Adesh University Journal of Medical Sciences & Research in 2020 compared post isometric relaxation, maximum voluntary isometric contraction and PNF hold relax techniques to increase the flexibility of hamstring muscles. Conclusion: Maximum voluntary isometric contraction was the most effective among the three, although all groups showed a significant increase in active knee extension ROM.

10. A study titled Comparison of Active Release Technique and Positional Release Therapy for Gastrosoleus Trigger Point Release in Recreational Runners, published in International Journal of Health Sciences and Research in Jul 2020, concludes: Positional Release Therapy is a better intervention for the release of trigger points as it shows a greater increase in ankle dorsiflexion range of motion and significant reduction in pain.

VIDEOS

  1. A video titled The Secret Life of Fascia: Official Trailer gives some great visual info about fascia. There is also a link to rent or purchase the video on the page.
  2. A video titled Fascia: What is fascia? New research changes the way we look at pain is a brief history of research that supports the importance of fascia.

BOOKS

  1. Fascia: What it is and Why it Matters by David Lesondak (you can download the pdf). In addition, you can watch an interview the author about the book or download an audio podcast of the webinar
  2. Book abstract: Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Fascia Lata from StatPearls Publishing, Jun 2020 gives a wonderful review of all the structures of the pelvis and lower limb and how they relate to each other.

 

Here is some of the information I recently shared in my October newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This month is focused on the fascia, myofascia and trigger point information. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

STUDIES and ARTICLES

I receive a weekly update on anything published anywhere on the internet that includes information about fascia, myofascia and trigger points.  I try to glean the best of the information and provide a brief synopsis of the information. If you come across any information that you think would be good to share, please also feel free to pass that information along to: info@holistichealingarts.net


1. A blog article, titled Fascia Acts as a Second Nervous System, by Dr. Russell Schierling, offers several important concepts:

2.  A study, Effects of Local Ischemic Compression on Upper Limb Latent Myofascial Trigger Points: A Study of Subjective Pain and Linear Motor Performance concluded: the results suggest the Ischemic Compression effectiveness on pain and Motor Performance impairment in subjects with Latent TrPs. However, the Motor Performance of these patients is only partially improved after the Ischemic compression application.

3.  An article, titled Myofascial Pain Syndrome: Looked through the Lens of 11 Cases Managed by Myofascial Trigger Point Massage Therapy, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, published in International Journal of Medical and Pharmaceutical Case Reports, concludes: Myofascial pain syndrome linked with latent or active myofascial trigger points developed due to repeated strains and injuries needs to be diagnosed by history and palpation method, system evaluation and laboratory investigations. Though several interventions are used in myofascial pain syndrome, myofascial trigger point massage therapy alone is found to be reasonably effective with excellent results.

4.  A study, titled The Effect of Self-Myofascial release using tennis ball on pain in individuals with piriformis trigger points, published in International Journal of Basic and Applied Research, concludes: Subjects were asked to take small circular movements by sitting on a tennis ball under the buttocks for 60 seconds. The study concluded that Self-Myofascial Release using tennis ball helps in reducing pain and increasing the pain pressure threshold providing a simple yet effective alternative for piriformis trigger point pain.

5.  An abstract submitted for publication, titled AB0910 Effective restoring Motion and Effective Treatment of Myofascial and Neuropathic Low Back Pain by Targeted Dry Needling Using Ultrasound Guidance in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, concludes: Dry needling under ultrasound guidance effectively reduce myofascial pain ameliorate symptoms of neuropathy and local muscle hypo motility in low back pain.

6.  A study, titled Effects of Self-myofascial release using foam roller on range of motion and morphological changes in muscle: A crossover study, published in J Strength Cond Res. in May 2019, concludes: Self-myofascial release using foam roller is effective in improving range of motion in at least some conditions. However, its mechanism is still unclear.We hypothesized that the Foam Rolling intervention may increase ROM because of changes in fascicle length and aponeurosis displacement. Although ROM of both dorsiflexion and plantar flexion increased significantly after the Foam Rolling intervention (p<0,01), no significant differences were found in fascicle length and aponeurosis displacement before and after the foam rolling intervention.

7.  A case study, titled The effectiveness of positional release therapy in myofascial trigger points associated with recurrent lateral ankle sprain—a case study, published in World Journal of Pharmaceutical Research in Apr 2019, concludes: There was a significant decrease in the pain symptoms observed after the treatment, with the significant increase in Active ROM. It is concluded that Positional Release Therapy may be an effective treatment for pain and increase in Active ROM and pain decreased caused by trigger point due to recurrent lateral ankle sprain. (Peroneous muscles)

8.  An study titled, A study to compare the effect of muscle energy technique and positional release technique on pain and cervical ROM in patients with chronic upper trapezitis, published in International’Journal of Scientific Research, concludes: Muscle energy technique is an effective option in the treatment of chronic upper trapezitis.

9.  A study titled A comparative study to find out the immediate effect of occipital muscle inhibition and static hamstring stretching on hamstring tightness in young adults—an experimental study, published in International Journal of Scientific Research in May 2019, concludes: Both the techniques showed marked improvement in the outcome measure, but the occipital muscle inhibition is more effective for the hamstring tightness and it is easy to perform for the participants and it was observed that the effect was persistent for longer time.

1. VIDEOS
• A video titled Vancouver Fascia Congress Shoulder study: Myofascial Trigger point Release by Christopher Gordon, shows the results of a study of myofascial trigger point release on the elasticity and sensitization of the tissue.

BOOKS
Anatomy, Head and Neck, Deep Cervical Neck Fascia by Paul Sutcliffe and Savita Lasrado. Update Jun 2019 and found at StatPearls.

Anatomy, Abdomen and Pelvis, Femoral Triangle by Hayden Basinger and Jeffery P. Hogg. Update April 2091 and found at StatPearls

Here is some of the information I recently shared in my May newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This month is focused on fascia information. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

STUDIES and ARTICLES

I receive a weekly update on anything published anywhere on the internet that includes information about fascia.  I try to glean the best of the information and provide a brief synopsis of the information. If you come across any information that you think would be good to share, please also feel free to pass that information along to: info@holistichealingarts.net


1. A blog article titled, Fascia as a Proprioceptive Organ and its relationship to Chronic Pain, by Dr. Russell Schierling, offers several important concepts:

2.  An awesome post, found on Massage CE Directory on Facebook, regarding the Posterior pelvic fascia.

Posterior Pelvic fascia

3.  A study, Attenuation of postoperative adhesions using a modeled manual therapy, published at PLOS One, concludes: Maintained movements of damaged structures in the immediate postoperative period has potential to act as an effective preventive for attenuating cohesive postoperative adhesion development.

4.  An article titled, Expression of the endocannabinoid receptors in human fascial tissue, published at Fascia & Fitness, discussed a study from the Stecco group at the University of Padova in Italy published in the European Journal of Histochemistry, and confirms the presence of cannabinoids receptors in fascia.

5.  A blog article, Questions to Consider for Myofascial Therapy by Whitney Lowe, points out the results of a study from 2002 that has largely been ignored: There is negligible friction between the skin and this underlying fascial tissue. This should result in several techniques being questioned.

6.  A blog post, Fascia Micro Trauma may Contribute to DOMS, posted on Fascia & Fitness, proposes: increased sensitivity of muscle fascia to the stimulus (acupuncture needle) suggesting the source of pain is fascia rather than the muscle fibers themselves.

7.  A peer-reviewed article, The Awareness of the Fascial System, published on Cureus, is a great overview of how fascia functions, offering “new perspectives to understand what happens during palpatory contact. A fascial cell has not only memory but also the awareness of the mechanometabolic information it feels, and it has the anticipatory predisposition in preparing itself for alteration of its natural environment.

8.  An article titled, Anatomy of the Superficial Fascia System of the Breast: A Comprehensive Theory of Breast Fascial Anatomy, published in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Nov 2018, concludes: the breast is shaped by a three-dimensional, fibrofatty fascial system. Two layers of this system surround the corpus mammae and fuse together around it, and anchor it to the chest wall in a structure we have called the circummammary ligament.

9.  An article, Fascia is Able to Actively Contract and May Thereby Influence Musculoskeletal Dynamics: A Histochemical and Mechanographic Investigation, published in Front. Physical. Apr 2019, concludes: tension of myofascial tissue is actively regulated by myofibroblasts with the potential to impact active musculoskeletal dynamics

10.  A study titled, Roller Massage: Comparison of three different surface type pattern foam rollers on passive knee range of motion and pain pereption, published in Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies May 2019, concludes: The GRID and multilevel surface rollers produced greater immediate post-intervention effects than the smooth roller. The therapeutic effects of the GRID and multilevel rollers may be due to the surface architecture. These rollers may provide a greater deformation of the tissues which creates a local mechanical and global neurophysiological effect.

VIDEOS

Here is some of the information I recently shared in my October newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This month is focused on fascia, myofascia and trigger point information. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

STUDIES, ARTICLES, and RESOURCES

I receive a weekly update on anything published anywhere on the internet that includes information about fascia, myofascia and trigger points.  I try to glean the best of the information and provide a brief synopsis of the information. If you come across any information that you think would be good to share, please also feel free to pass that information along to: info@holistichealingarts.net


1.  An article, titled Three-dimensional mathematical model for deformation of human fascia in manual therapy by Chaudhry, Schleip, et al., and published in J AM Osteopath Assoc in 2008 concludes: the three-dimensional model’s equations revealed that very large forces, outside the normal physiologic range, are required to produce even 1% compression and 1% shear in fascia lata and plantar fascia. Such large forces are not required to produce substantial compression and shear in superficial nasal fascia, however. The palpable sensations of tissue release that are often reported by osteopathic physicians and other manual therapists cannot be due to deformations produced in the firm tissues of plantar fascia and fascia lata.

2.  An informative article, written by Kimberlie Landers of Swedish Medical Center, titled Fascia: The Mysterious Tissue-N2 Physical Therapy offers an in-depth and understandable review of the tissue. It discusses: What is fascia, how can it relate to or cause pain, and what can be done about dense fascia, including kinesio-taping, Graston, cupping, skin rolling, and a technique called The Stecco Method of Fascia Manipulation, which revolves around “Centers of Coordination”. 

3.  An article, written by the late Leon Chaitow and published in 2009 in Massage Today, titled Research in Water and Fascia: Micro-tornadoes, hydrogenated diamonds and nanocrystals references some information from previous articles:

In this article, Mr. Chaitow discusses an article by Dr. Martin Grumble about the characteristics of water in the body and the creation of nanocrystals involved in protein folding.

4.  An article by Simeon Niel Asher, titled Understanding Trigger Points-Embryological Development of Fascia provides an overview of the embryological origin of connective tissues (which) may provide some insights into the formation and location of trigger points. 

5.  An article, Defining the fascial system published at the RMT Education Project, defines fascia as: …a sheath, a sheet, or any other dissectible aggregations of connective tissue that forms beneath the skin to attach, enclose, and separate muscles and other internal organs.  It also defines the fascial system: consists of the three-dimensional continuum of soft, collagen-containing, loose and dense fibrous connective tissues that permeate the body…

6.  An article by Ross Turchaninov and Boris Prilutsky, published at Science of Massage Institute, titled Ischemic Compression: To Be or Not to Be? Science of Trigger Point Therapy offers scientific support to explain the role of ischemic compression in increasing the blood supply to muscle and trigger point areas

7.  A very long article by Paul Ingraham published in Pain Science titled Trigger Point Doubts: a thorough review of the problems with the science of ‘muscle knots’ and myofascial pain syndrome discusses the sketchy science and dogma around the concept of trigger points.

8. A post by Dr. Leon Chaitow, published on LinkedIn on Dec 10, 2016, titled Telocytes: recently identified connective tissue cells summarizes the following information: 

9.  A brief discussion on the RMTEducation page, titled The effect of trigger point compression for acute low back pain reviews the results of a study from Japan: From a clinical perspective, myofascial trigger points certainly describe a phenomenon—aching spots, that seem to at least be partially helped by massage. The issue is that there is still uncertainty on the subject of trigger points (eg. what they are and the subjective nature of their identification). To help provide some insight and perspective for therapists, …a study out of Japan that looks at the effects of compression at myofascial trigger points in patients with acute low back pain—Nakamoto, K., Bit, I., Urakawa, S., Sakai, S., Kigawa, M., Ono, T., Nishijo, H. (2015) Effects of compression at myofascial trigger points in patients with acute low back pain: randomized controlled trial. Our J Pain 10, 1186-1196.

10.  An article, published in the European Journal of Histochemistry, and summarized on the fascial fitness Australia site shows: the presence of CB1 and CB2 receptors in fascial fibroblasts suggests their possible role in modulation of fascial pain. The fascial pain is usually related to a fascial inflammation and/or a fascial fibrosis, and both could be related to an alteration of the endocannabinoid system. …The authors also hypothesized a possibility that the endocannabinoid system inside the deep fasciae is stimulated during manipulative treatments and exercises.

VIDEOS

BOOKS

© 2020 Advanced Holistic Healing Arts 
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