Here is some of the information I recently shared in the October newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This newsletter is focused on foot pain and plantar fasciitis. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, which include links to the studies as well as special offers and sales coupons, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Comparing toe separators and insoles in hallux valgus treatment
  2. Effect of Local Percutaneous radiofrequency for chronic plantar fasciitis
  3. Comparing stretching exercise and high-load strengtheing exercise
  4. Acute Kinetic and Kinematic differences between minimalist sandal, shod and barefoot running
  5. Comparing intralesional platelet rich plasma injection and extracorporeal shockwave therapy
  6. Functional evaluation and pain symptomatology or foot and ankle in severely obese
  7. Comparing splinting, exercise, and electrotherapy in hallux valgus
  8. Comparing phonophoresis and myofascial release in plantar fasciitis
  9. Comparing plantar fascia stretch and moist heat heel pad

The impact of anti-cancer treatment on feet

The Foot Tripod

STUDIES and ARTICLES

1. A study titled Comparison between the plantar pressure effects of toe separators and insoles in patients with hallux valgus at a one-month follow-up, published in Foot and Ankle Surgery Feb 2021, looked at the difference between prefabricated toe separators or customized insole. The study concluded: After one month of use, the customized insole was more effective in plantar pressure reduction than the toe separator for a hallux deformity.

2.  An article, titled Local Percutaneous Radiofrequency for Chronic Plantar Fasciitis, published in Arthroscopy Techniques in May 2021, compared the use of bipolar radio frequency treatment with open surgery and concludes: Bipolar radiofrequency appears to be a safe procedure for refractory plantar fasciitis that can provide outcomes equivalent to open plantar fascia release with less morbidity.

3. A study titled Physiotherapy Approach to Patients with Chronic Plantar Fasciitis: Comparison of the Effects of Specific Stretching Exercise and High-Load Strengthening Exercise, published in Journal of the Korean Society of Integrative Medicine in Sept 2021 compared Extracorporeal shock wave therapy combined with daily plantar-specific stretching with extracorporeal shock wave therapy and high-load progressive strength exercise every other day. The study concludes: the high-load strengthening exercise consisting of the progressive exercise protocol resulted in superior results after 12 weeks compared with plantar-specific stretching.

4. A small study, performed as a part of a Master’s Thesis at Stellenbosch University, titled Acute Kinetic and Kinematic Differences between Minimalist Sandal, Shod, and Barefoot Running in Habitually Shod Male Recreational Trail Runners, concludes: minimalist running simulates barefoot running. Vertical load rates may be higher in a barefoot and minimalist sandal condition during the initial transition period because of a lack of kinematic changes at the knee.

5. A study titled A comparative study between intralesional platelet rich plasma injection and extracorporeal shockwave therapy for the treatment of plantar fasciitis, published in Journal of Arthroscopy and Joint Surgery in Sept 2021, concludes:Both autologous Platelet Rich  Plasma and extracorporeal shock wave therapy can become extremely useful modalities for management of recalcitrant cases of plantar fasciitis with no known adverse effects.

6. A study, titled Functional evaluation and pain symptomatology of the foot and ankle in individuals with severe obesity—controlled transversal study, published in Rev Bras Ortop (Sao Paulo) in Apr 2021, concludes: the incidence of foot pain was higher in the group of severely obese patients (BMI >40) compared with the control group. According to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society scale, functional forefoot, mid foot, and hind foot performance was worse in severely obese individuals.

7. A study titled A comparison of the effectiveness of splinting, exercise, and electrotherapy in women patients with hallux valgus: A randomized clinical trial, published in The Foot in Sept 2021, concludes:
    Conservative treatment methods improve foot function in patients with mild to moderate Hallux Valgus
    Splinting was more effective than exercise and electrotherapy in the management of Hallux Valgus.
    A combination of splinting, exercise and electrotherapy may be more beneficial to improve Hallux Valgus symptoms.

8. A study titled Effect of phonophoresis and myofascial release in plantar fasciitis, published in Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics in 2021 concludes: phonophoresis was found to be more helpful than myofacial release in lowering pain and improving functional status.

9.  A study titled A comparative study to analyze the effect of plantar fascia stretch and heel pad with moist heat in the patients of plantar fasciitis, published in Global Journal of Medical and Clinical Short Communications in Aug 2021, concludes: plantar fascia stretch has more significant effect on plantar fasciitis than heel pad with moist heat.

TIDBITS, UPDATES, and RESOURCES

REFERENCE

  1. An article, found at iocp.org.uk, titled The Impact of Anti-cancer treatment on feet by Afni Shah-Hamilton in spring 2021, is a great reference on the effects of chemotherapy on the feet and how those challenges may be treated.                                                     
  2. A great facebook post, by Michael Mcaleese, titled The Foot Tripod shows the importance of standing on the whole foot, not just the heel or toes.

Here is some of the information I recently shared in the April newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This newsletter is focused on foot and ankle pain and plantar fasciitis. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, which include links to the studies as well as special offers and sales coupons, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Increasing ankle dorsiflexion range of motion
  2. Comparing Active release and Positional release for Gastrosoleus trigger point release
  3. Correlation between Gastrocnemius tightness and heel pain
  4. Effect of upward toe springs on walking biomechanics
  5. Comparing Botulinum Toxin A, Corticosteroid, and anesthetic injection for plantar fasciitis
  6. Effect of foam roller on pain and ankle range of motion
  7. Comparing adjuvant low-dye kinesio taping, sham taping, or extracorporeal shockwave therapy
  8. Comparing muscle energy technique versus ischemic compression on pain and disability
  9. Effect of myofascial release with lower limb strengthening on plantar fasciitis
  10. Dry needling effectiveness for plantar heel pain
  11.  Exploration of Valgus, Varus, Vargus

STUDIES and ARTICLES

1. An article titled Strategies to increase ankle dorsiflexion range of motion by Drs. Howe, Waldron, North, and Bampouras reviews exercise-based strategies to restore ankle dorsiflexion range of motion.

2.  A study titled Comparison of Active Release Technique and Positional Release Therapy for Gastrosoleus Trigger Point Release in Recreational Runners, published in International Journal of Health Sciences and Research in July 2020, concludes: Positional Release Therapy is a better intervention for the release of trigger points as it shows a greater increase in ankle dorsiflexion range of motion and a significant reduction in pain.

3. A study titled Correlation Between Gastrocnemius Tightness and Heel Pain Severity in Plantar Fasciitis, published in Foot & Ankle International in Sept 2020 concludes: a strong, statistically significant correlation between gastrocnemius tightness and the severity of heel pain in plantar fasciitis.

4. An intriguing study titled Effect of the upward curvature of toe springs on walking biomechanics in humans, published in Scientific Reports in Sept 2020 found: although most features of modern footwear have been intensively studied, there has been almost no research on the effects of toe springs. This nearly ubiquitous upward curvature of the sole at the front of the shoe elevates the toe box dorsally above the ground and thereby holds the toes in a constantly dorsiflexed  position. While it is generally recognized that toe springs facilitate the forefoot’s ability to roll forward at the end of stance, toe springs may also have some effect on natural foot function. Our results help explain why toe springs have been a pervading feature in shoes for centuries but also suggest that toe springs may contribute to weakening of the foot muscles and possibly to increased susceptibility to common pathological conditions such as plantar fasciitis. 

5. A study titled Comparison of Botulinum Toxin A, Corticosteroid, and Anesthetic Injection for Plantar Fasciitis, published in Foot & Ankle International, concluded: no significant differences between treatment groups were observed. The pain relief and functional improvement obtained with the different treatments was maintained during the 6-month follow-up.

6. A study. titled Immediate effect of foam roller on pain and ankle range of motion in patients with plantar fasciitis: A randomized controlled trial, published in Hong Kong Physiotherapy Journal in Oct 2020, concluded: both stretching and foam rolling techniques helped in reducing pain and increasing the ROM. However, the effectiveness of foam roller was superior to stretching in terms of increase in pressure pain thresholds at gastrocnemius and soleus.

7. A study titled Effects of Adjuvant Low-dye kinesio taping, adjuvant sham taping, or extracorporeal shockwave therapy alone in plantar fasciitis: a randomized double-blind controlled trial, published in Europe PMC in Nov 2020, concludes: Low-dye KT, in addition to ESWT is more effective than sham-taping and ESWT in pain relief and foot function improvement at a 4-week follow-up.

8.  A study titled Effect of muscle energy technique versus ischemic compression on pain and disability in patients with plantar fasciitis, published in International Journal of Physiology, Nutrition and Physical Education in 2020 concluded:  both the muscle energy technique and ischemic compression were individually effective in improving the flexibility and strength. While comparing both techniques there is no significant difference present between the groups.

9. A study titled Effect of myofascial release with lower limb strengthening on plantar fasciitis, published in International Journal of Physical Education, Sports and Health in 2021 concludes: myofascial release is significantly effective when given with lower limb strengthening programs for reducing pain and improving the functional status in subjects with plantar fasciitis.

10. A study titled Is Dry Needling effective for the management of plantar heel pain or plantar fasciitis? An updated systematic review and meta-analysis published in Pain Medicine in Mar 2021 concluded: moderate to low evidence suggests a positive effect of TrP dry needling for improving pain intensity and pain-related disability in patients with plantar heel pain of musculoskeletal origin at short- and long-term, respectively.

TIDBITS and RESOURCES

REFERENCE

A great article, by Whitney Lowe, titled Valgus, Varus, Vargus…What is it? in Nov 2015, covers a very understandable definition of these joint dysfunctions and what they can cause.

Here is some of the information I recently shared in my November newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This month is focused on foot and ankle information. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

STUDIES, ARTICLES, and RESOURCES

I receive a weekly update on anything published anywhere on the internet that includes information about feet and ankles.  I try to glean the best of the information and provide a brief synopsis of the information. If you come across any information that you think would be good to share, please also feel free to pass that information along to: info@holistichealingarts.net


1. A study titled “Spinal and Peripheral dry needling versus peripheral dry needling alone among individuals with a history of lateral ankle pain: a randomized controlled trial”, published in Int J Sports Phys Ther in Dec 2017, suggests: Dry needling of the multifidi in addition to fibularis muscles does not result in improvement in strength, unilateral balance or unilateral hop test performance, compared to Dry Needling the fibularis muscles alone among individuals with a history of ankle sprain.

2. A study titled “Dry cupping for plantar fasciitis: a randomized controlled trial”, published in J Phys Ther Sci in May 2017, concludes: The data indicated that both dry cupping therapy and electrical stimulation therapy could reduce pain and increase function significantly in the population tested…There was no significant difference between the dry cupping therapy and electrical stimulation groups in all the outcome measurements. These results support that both dry cupping therapy and electrical stimulation therapy could reduce pain and increase function in the population tested.

3. A study titled “Effectiveness of Myofascial Release in Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis: A RCT”, published in Indian Journal of Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy, concludes: Conservative treatment approach like physiotherapy in the treatment of plantar fasciitis, is beneficial, although both the conventional treatment and myofascial release have found to be effective in alleviation of symptoms and associated disability in plantar fasciitis. However, the subjects treated with myofascial release showed an additional benefit in terms of reduction of pain on VAs and functional ability in terms of FFI. Hence it can be concluded that myofascial release is an effective therapeutic option in the treatment of plantar fasciitis.  

4. Whitney Lowe’s article, Understanding Overpronation, in Massage Today in Jan 2007, gives a very good explanation of what overpronation is and the problems it can cause.

5. A study article, titled Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome: Muscles Located at the Site of Pain, published in Scientifica (Cairo) in Mar 2016, concludes: The soles and flexor digitorum longus muscless were observed to attach directly to the posteromedial border of the tibia. The tibias posterior muscle had no attachment to this site. Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that if traction is the cause of MTSS then soleus and the flexor digitorum muscles and not the tibias posterior muscles are the likely cause of MTSS. 

6. A study. titled “Ischemic compression and joint mobilizations or the treatment of nonspecific myofascial foot pain: findings from two quasi-experimental before-and-after studies”, published Mar 2015 in J Can Chiropr Assoc concludes:  Preliminary evidence that myofascial therapy consisting of ischemic compressions and joint mobilizations may reduce the symptoms of patients suffering from chronic non-specific foot pain….Combined treatment involving ischemic compression and joint mobilization for chronic foot pain is associated with significant improvements in functional and self-perceived improvement immediately and at up to six months post-treatment.

7. A video, Metatarsal Mobilization by Whitney Lowe suggests a treatment for a common nerve entrapment problem, Morton’s neuron. The video can be found on ABMP’s facebook page.

8. A study, “Effects of myofascial trigger point release in plantar fasciitis for pain management", published in J Med Sci in 2018, concluded: myofascial trigger point technique was seen effective in relation to improved pain in patients of plantar fasciitis.

VIDEOS

2.  Miscellaneous

1. From Gary Ward:  The Great Hallux (a small rant)
2.  Per Michael McAleese:  We can not keep changing the shape of our feet and expecting our feet to function like feet .. as always it is your choice
© 2020 Advanced Holistic Healing Arts 
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