Here is some of the information I recently shared in the February newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This newsletter is focused on cupping. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, which include links to the studies as well as special offers and sales coupons, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Cupping for post-herpetic neuralgia
  2. Active movement decompression vs Static decompression
  3. Pressure ranges of Fire cupping method
  4. Cupping as an anti-inflammation therapy and immunomodulator in cancer patients
  5. Dry cupping for runners with plantar fasciitis
  6. Efficacy of wet cupping for sciatic pain
  7. Brief Dry Cupping for muscle soreness
  8. Safety of cupping on stroke survivors
  9. Effect of dry cupping for non-specific low back pain

STUDIES and ARTICLES

1. A study, titled Acupuncture and moxibustion combined with cupping for the treatment of post-herpetic neuralgia, published in Medicine Aug 2021, concluded: The effect of acupuncture and moxibustion combined with cupping in the treatment of PHN is significantly higher than that of conventional western medicine and it can significantly prevent the occurrence of PHN.

2.  A study titled The effects of Active Movement Myofascial Decompression Therapy and Static Myofascial Decompression Therapy on Range of Motion, Muscle strength, Functional Movement in Young Adults, published in Journal of The Korean Society of Integrative Medicine in Sept 2021 concludes: As a result of this experiment, both active movement myofascial decompression and static myofascial decompression had a positive effect on dependent variable. Therefore the study is meaningful in that it is easier and simpler to see the effect on flexibility, muscle strength, and functional movement just by implementing movement myofascial decompression.

3. A study titled An Experimental Study on the Pressure Range of Fire Cupping Method, published in Journal of Acupuncture Research in May 2021 concludes: Large glass cups which are widely used in clinical practice, when used in the fire cupping method exerted pressure ranging from -381.947 mmHG to -391.973 mm HG

4. A study titled Cupping Therapy as an Anti-inflammation Therapy and Immunomodulator in Cancer Patients, published in Journal of Gastrointestinal Cancer in 2021, concludes: Similar to anti-inflammatory drugs, cupping therapy may be seen as an adjuvant therapeutic strategy to modulate host microenvironment by reducing inflammation and modulating immune system, all actions the could be useful in biological treatments, in cancer patients

5. A study titled Effectiveness of dry cupping on pain, dynamic balance and functional performance in recreational runners with chronic plantar fasciitis, published in Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Care in Aug 2021, found: Significant improvement were observed in both the groups (Dry cupping or conventional therapy). However, the dry cupping group showed significantly greater improvements as compared to control group. Significant group differences were illustrated for pain, dynamic balance, and functional performance.

6. A study titled Efficacy of Himajah bil-shart (Wet Cupping) on Irq Al-Nasa (Sciatic Pain): A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial, published in International Journal of Research Publication and Reviews in Oct 2021 concluded: Hijamah Bil-Shart (Wet Cupping) could be an effective therapy for the management of pain in patients of Irq al-Nasa (Sciatic pain) without any adverse effects.

7. A study titled Effects of Brief Dry Cupping on Muscle Soreness in the Gastrocnemius Muscle and Flexibility of the Ankle, published in Asian Journal of Kinesiology in 2021, concludes: Ninety seconds of dry cupping on the calf may reduce 24-hr muscle soreness after performing heel drops to exhaustion, but had no effect on ROM.

8. A study titled The effectiveness and safety of cupping therapy for stroke survivors: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, published in DBpia in 2021 concludes: …the potential of CT to be beneficial in managing a variety of complications in stroke survivors.

9.  A study titled Effect of Dry Cupping Therapy on Pain and Functional Disability in Persistent Non-Specific Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial, published in Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies in 2021, concludes: Dry cupping was more effective in improving pain and functional disability in people with persistent nonspecific low back pain when compared to the sham

 

Here is some of the information I recently shared in the October newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This newsletter is focused on foot pain and plantar fasciitis. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, which include links to the studies as well as special offers and sales coupons, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Comparing toe separators and insoles in hallux valgus treatment
  2. Effect of Local Percutaneous radiofrequency for chronic plantar fasciitis
  3. Comparing stretching exercise and high-load strengtheing exercise
  4. Acute Kinetic and Kinematic differences between minimalist sandal, shod and barefoot running
  5. Comparing intralesional platelet rich plasma injection and extracorporeal shockwave therapy
  6. Functional evaluation and pain symptomatology or foot and ankle in severely obese
  7. Comparing splinting, exercise, and electrotherapy in hallux valgus
  8. Comparing phonophoresis and myofascial release in plantar fasciitis
  9. Comparing plantar fascia stretch and moist heat heel pad

The impact of anti-cancer treatment on feet

The Foot Tripod

STUDIES and ARTICLES

1. A study titled Comparison between the plantar pressure effects of toe separators and insoles in patients with hallux valgus at a one-month follow-up, published in Foot and Ankle Surgery Feb 2021, looked at the difference between prefabricated toe separators or customized insole. The study concluded: After one month of use, the customized insole was more effective in plantar pressure reduction than the toe separator for a hallux deformity.

2.  An article, titled Local Percutaneous Radiofrequency for Chronic Plantar Fasciitis, published in Arthroscopy Techniques in May 2021, compared the use of bipolar radio frequency treatment with open surgery and concludes: Bipolar radiofrequency appears to be a safe procedure for refractory plantar fasciitis that can provide outcomes equivalent to open plantar fascia release with less morbidity.

3. A study titled Physiotherapy Approach to Patients with Chronic Plantar Fasciitis: Comparison of the Effects of Specific Stretching Exercise and High-Load Strengthening Exercise, published in Journal of the Korean Society of Integrative Medicine in Sept 2021 compared Extracorporeal shock wave therapy combined with daily plantar-specific stretching with extracorporeal shock wave therapy and high-load progressive strength exercise every other day. The study concludes: the high-load strengthening exercise consisting of the progressive exercise protocol resulted in superior results after 12 weeks compared with plantar-specific stretching.

4. A small study, performed as a part of a Master’s Thesis at Stellenbosch University, titled Acute Kinetic and Kinematic Differences between Minimalist Sandal, Shod, and Barefoot Running in Habitually Shod Male Recreational Trail Runners, concludes: minimalist running simulates barefoot running. Vertical load rates may be higher in a barefoot and minimalist sandal condition during the initial transition period because of a lack of kinematic changes at the knee.

5. A study titled A comparative study between intralesional platelet rich plasma injection and extracorporeal shockwave therapy for the treatment of plantar fasciitis, published in Journal of Arthroscopy and Joint Surgery in Sept 2021, concludes:Both autologous Platelet Rich  Plasma and extracorporeal shock wave therapy can become extremely useful modalities for management of recalcitrant cases of plantar fasciitis with no known adverse effects.

6. A study, titled Functional evaluation and pain symptomatology of the foot and ankle in individuals with severe obesity—controlled transversal study, published in Rev Bras Ortop (Sao Paulo) in Apr 2021, concludes: the incidence of foot pain was higher in the group of severely obese patients (BMI >40) compared with the control group. According to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society scale, functional forefoot, mid foot, and hind foot performance was worse in severely obese individuals.

7. A study titled A comparison of the effectiveness of splinting, exercise, and electrotherapy in women patients with hallux valgus: A randomized clinical trial, published in The Foot in Sept 2021, concludes:
    Conservative treatment methods improve foot function in patients with mild to moderate Hallux Valgus
    Splinting was more effective than exercise and electrotherapy in the management of Hallux Valgus.
    A combination of splinting, exercise and electrotherapy may be more beneficial to improve Hallux Valgus symptoms.

8. A study titled Effect of phonophoresis and myofascial release in plantar fasciitis, published in Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics in 2021 concludes: phonophoresis was found to be more helpful than myofacial release in lowering pain and improving functional status.

9.  A study titled A comparative study to analyze the effect of plantar fascia stretch and heel pad with moist heat in the patients of plantar fasciitis, published in Global Journal of Medical and Clinical Short Communications in Aug 2021, concludes: plantar fascia stretch has more significant effect on plantar fasciitis than heel pad with moist heat.

TIDBITS, UPDATES, and RESOURCES

REFERENCE

  1. An article, found at iocp.org.uk, titled The Impact of Anti-cancer treatment on feet by Afni Shah-Hamilton in spring 2021, is a great reference on the effects of chemotherapy on the feet and how those challenges may be treated.                                                     
  2. A great facebook post, by Michael Mcaleese, titled The Foot Tripod shows the importance of standing on the whole foot, not just the heel or toes.

Here is some of the information I recently shared in the September newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This newsletter is focused on fascia, myofascia, and trigger points. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, which include links to the studies as well as special offers and sales coupons, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Dry needling vs trigger point manual therapy for myofascial pain
  2. Scalene Trigger Points: The Great Imitators
  3. Dry needling vs dry needling with intramuscular electrical stimulation
  4. Dry needling decreases hamstring tightness
  5. Positional release therapy for the treatment of upper TRapezius trigger points
  6. Effect of ice massage with integrated nauromuscular inhibition technique
  7. Kinesio Tape on fascia for muscle activity
  8. Suboccipital muscle inhibition technique on hamstring tightness
  9. Iliacus trigger point release affects angle of anterior pelvic tilt
  10. Comparison of ischemic compression therapy vs deep friction massage for trigger points.

STUDIES and ARTICLES

1. A article titled Comparison of dry needling and trigger point manual therapy in patients with neck and upper back myofascial pain syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis, published in Sep 2020 in Journal of Manual and Manipulative Therapy, concludes: both dry needling and trigger point manual therapy improve pain and function in the short to medium term. Neither is more superior than the other.

2.  An excellent review article titled Scalene Trigger Points: The Great Imitators by Donald Murphy in Dynamic Chiropractic, explains the different types of manifestation of active trigger points in the scalene muscles.

3. A study titled Rate and maintenance of improvement of myofascial pain with dry needling alone vs dry needling with intramuscular electrical stimulation: a randomized controlled trial, published in Sep 2020 in Journal of Manual & Manipulative Therapy concludes: dry needling and dry needling with intramuscular electrical stiumlation demonstrated improvement and maintenance in disability and pain for 6 weeks. No differences in improvement of disability or pain existed between the groups at week 6 or 12.

4. A study titled Dry needling for hamstring flexibility: A single-blind randomized controlled trial, published in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation in Oct 2020 concludes: Dry needling is effective in improving hamstring flexibility compared with static stretching. One session of dry needling can be an effective treatment for hamstring tightness and increasing flexibility.

5. A study titled Positional release therapy for the treatment of upper Trapezius trigger points, published in Clinical Images and Case Report Journal in Oct 2020, concludes: Positional release therapy was found to be effective in the treatment of upper Trapezius trigger points as it significantly increases cervical reange of motion and reduction of pain.

6. A study titled Effect of ice massage with integrated neuromuscular inhibition technique on pain and function in subjects with mechanical neck pain: randomized controlled trial, publsihed in Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy in Nov 2020, concludes: ice massage and integrated neuromuscular inhibition technique are effective methods in managing active trigger points in the upper Trapezius of person having mechnical neck pain without statistically significant difference.

7. A study titled Kinesio tape for Fascia on Trunk Muscle Activity during Plank, published in Oct 2020 in J For Phys Ther, concludes: K applying on the fasciaw of trageted muscle increases the muscle activity. Therefore, we cna also focus on the fascia to increase muscle activities, not only on muscles.

8. A study titled Effect of Suboccipital Muscle Inhibition Technique on Hamstring Tightness in Healthy Adults-An Interventional Study, published in Oct 2020 compared suboccipital muscle inhibition technique and static stretching to static stretching along. The study concludes: suboccipital muscle inhibition technique is effective in improving flexibiliyt of hamstring muscle.

9.  A study titled Evaluation of the impact of ilacus trigger points on angle of pelvic inclination in healthy individuals, published in Nov 2016 and presented at the Global Physiotherapy Congress in Florida by Emil Mete of Istanbul Medeniyet University, was focused on the effect of the Iliacus trigger point on the angle of anterior pelvic tilt. The study concludes: after iliacus trigger point release a significant decrease was found in the angle of anterior pelvic tilt, a decrease was found in the Thomas test, and an increase was found in pain pressure threshold.10.  A study titled Comparison between effects of ischemic compression therapy and deep friction massage therapy for trigger points in neck and upper back, published in Jun 2020 in JRCRS, concludes: ...ischemic compression is more effective than deep friction massage in patients with MTrP's in the neck and upper back for decreasing pain and disability, but for increasing cervical ROM, both therapuetic approaches are equally useful.

10.  A study titled Comparison between effects of ischemic compression therapy and deep friction massage therapy for trigger points in neck and upper back, pubnlished in Jun 2020 in JRCRS concludes: ...ischemic compression is more effective than deep friction massage in patients with MTrP's in the neck and upper back for decreasing pain and disability, but for increasing cervical ROM, both therapuetic approaches are equally useful.

Here is some of the information I recently shared in the August newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This newsletter is focused on the lymphatic system and lymph drainage therapy. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, which include links to the studies as well as special offers and sales coupons, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Lipossage Endermologie vs Monopolar Radiofrequency on Cellulite
  2. MLD used to treat symptoms of neuro disease
  3. Use of KT to treat chronic knee pain
  4. Effects of lymphatic drainage on autonomic nervous system
  5. Intermittent Pneumatic Compression Therapy after lipoabdominoplasty
  6. Negative Pressure massage for cancer-related lymphedema
  7. Effect of MLD on muscle tone, pain and depression in breast cancer
  8. Hot compress vs Hot ginger compress for breast engorgement
  9. Psychiatric disorders and immune responses intertwined
  10. Use of MLD on musculoskeletal injuries

REFERENCES

  1. Anatomy review of the lymphatics of the meningeal system
  2. Anatomy of the mouth lymphatic organs
  3. Tattoo ink presents as calcifications in axillary lymph nodes

STUDIES and ARTICLES

1. A study titled Lipomassage Endermologie versus Monopolar Radiofrequency on Cellulite in Females, published in PJMHS July 2020 concludes: Both Monopolar radio frequency therapy and Lipomassage Endermologie were found to be safe, effective, and available at the selected dose. However, Monopolar radio frequency therapy was superior to Lipomassage Endermologie in reducing cellulite.

2.  A study, titled Investigation of the Less Known Effects of Manual Lymphatic Drainage: A Narrative Review, published in Lymphatic Research and Biology, Mar 2021, concludes;  MLD can be used in symptomatic treatment of various diseases (multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease).

3. A study, Current evidence does support the use of KT to treat chronic knee pain in short term: A systematic review and meta-analysis, published in Pain Research and Management in 2021 concludes: KT is essential to relieve chronic knee pain and prevent massive use injuries in patients with chronic knee pain but not in a long-term effects…could be temporarily used in practice for exercise or rehabilitation training.

4. A study titled Effects of lymphatic drainage therapy on autonomic nervous system responses in healthy subjects: A single blind randomized controlled trial, published in Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies Jul 2021 concludes: study demonstrated that LDT decreased autonomic activity via decreased spinal reflex excitability and tension in healthy participants.

5. A study, Influences of Intermittent Pneumatic Compression Therapy on Edema and Postoperative Patient’s Satisfaction after Lipoabdominoplasty published in Aesthetic Plastic Surgery in Apr 2021 concluded: the application of Intermittent Pneumatic Compression therapy while wearing a compression garment was superior as compared to compression garment alone in reaching the abdominal edema and improving postoperative patent satisfaction following lipoabdominoplasty.

6. A small study titled Treatment of breast cancer-related lymphedema using negative pressure massage: A Pilot randomized controlled trial, published in Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in Aug 2021 concludes:  compared to MLD, treatment with NPMT resulted in greater improvement in L-Dex scores and inter limb volume difference in women with a duration of unilateral upper limb LE of >1 year.

7. A study titled Manual Lymphatic Drainage on the Muscle Tone, Pain, and Depression in patient with breast cancer published in Journal of the Korean Society of Integrative Medicine in 2021 concludes:  MLD is an effective method for reducing muscle tone, pain, and depression in patients with breast cancer. 

8.  A study titled Comparing the effects of hot compress and hot ginger compress on pain associated with breast engorgement, published in Nursing and Midwifery Studies in 2021 concludes: Hot ginger compress is more effective than hot compress in reducing breast engorgement pain among breastfeeding women.

9.  A paper titled Immunoceptive inference: why are psychiatric disorders and immune responses intertwined, published in Biol Philos in 2021 details the relationship between immune responses and the physiology of the brain and concludes:  interoceptive inference claims the brain is continuously updating productions about, and acting upon, the body it inhabit. In our formulation, the body itself ( in this case, the immune system) is seen as furnishing precision of —and acting upon—sensory input, informing “beliefs” about whether an antigen belongs to the category of “self” or “non self.”In so doing, we have highlighted three practical contributions (translation, unification, and simulation ) of the active inference framework…we suggested that it is inevitable that two systems within the same Markov blanket influence each other.

10.  A study titled The use of manual lymphatic drainage on clinical presentation of musculoskeletal injuries: A systematic review published in Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice in 2021 concludes:  Manual lymphatic drainage is as effective as other treatment modalities to reduce edema, manual lymphatic drainage may be used to improve clinical presentation of musculoskeletal injuries, and manual lymphatic drainage may be used alone or combined to other treatment modalities.

REFERENCES

  1. An anatomy review of the lymphatics of the meningeal system is in-depth and backed by studies.  It is titled:  Meningeal lymphatic vessels: their morphology, location, and clinical implications, published in EUR J Anat in 2021
  2. A review of the anatomy of the mouth which is very thorough and understandable, titled Anatomy and physiology of the palatine tonsils, adenoids, and lingual tonsils published in World Journal of Otorhinolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery in July 2021 is helpful for anyone working on the head and neck.
  3. An information article titled Ink on the move: tattoo pigment resembling axillary lymph node calcifications, published in Clinical Imaging in 2021 highlights:  a)Tattoo pigment may mimic calcifications in axillary lymph nodes; b)  tattoo pigment should be considered in the differential diagnosis of axillary lymph node densities, and c) recognizing pigment migration may help breast radiologists form an appropriate differential diagnosis. 

Here is some of the information I recently shared in the August newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This newsletter is focused on cupping therapy. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, which include links to the studies as well as special offers and sales coupons, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Effect of cup size on skin blood flow response
  2. Effect of pressure and duration on skin blood flow response
  3. Impact on skin blood flow under moving cupping
  4. Cupping in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome
  5. interscapular cupping effect on blood pressure, oxygen saturation, pulse rate, and chest expansion
  6. Cupping with ginger aromatherapy for reducing cholesterol levels
  7. Dry cupping for knee osteroarthritis
  8. effects of ear acupuncture with cupping for chronic back pain

STUDIES and ARTICLES

1. A study, titled Using reactive hyperemia to investigate the effect of cupping sizes of cupping therapy on skin blood flow responses, published in J Back Musculoskelet Rehabil in 2021, compared the effect of 3 sizes of cups, (35, 40, and 45 mm) on skin blood flow. Their conclusion: all three cup sizes can significantly increase skin blood flow. The 45 mm cup is more effective compared to the 35 mm cup.

2.  A study titled Effects of Pressures and Duration of Cupping Therapy on Skin Blood Flow Responses, published in Front Bioeng Biotechnolin Dec 2020 compares 4 different treatments:  -225 mmHg at 5 and 10 minutes and -300 mmHg at 5 and 10 minutes.  The results showed that -300 mmHg caused a significant increase in peak skin blood flow compared to -225mmHg under 5 minutes. A higher value of negative pressure is more effective on increasing skin blood flow compared to a lower value and shorter duration causes a larger peak and total skin blood flow compared to a longer duration.

3. A study titled Impacts on skin blood flow under moving cupping along meridians in different directions, published  in Mar 2013 in Zhongguo Zhen Jui concludes: Blood flow was increased significantly and was more apparently increased in the moving cupping area. The local effects are similar between moving cupping following the meridian running direction and that against the running direction.

4. A discussion titled Is There a Role of Cupping Therapy in the Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Primary Care Setting, published in Jan 2021 in Cureus states:
    a.  cupping consists of application of quick, vigorous, and rhythmical strokes on the skin with the help of suction cup which stimulate cutaneous, subcutaneous muscles and increases blood flow in that area.
    b.  In the primary care setting where resources are limited for surgical intervention, the usage of cupping therapy as add-on therapy along with medial management can be an effective method of treatment.
    c.  there is a need of regulatory body for cupping therapy. A standardized procedure with established protocols will be beneficial as well as defining contraindications and complications for cupping therapy.

5. A study titled Immediate effect of interscapular cupping on blood pressure, oxygen saturation, pulse rate and chest expansion in sedentary smoker students, published in J Complement Integr Med Feb 2021 concludes: Both wet cupping and dry cupping showed improvements in all measurements (systolic and diastolic BP, upper and lower chest expansion, O2 saturation, and pulse rate) in sedentary male smoker students after a single cupping session. 

6. A study titled Application of Cupping Therapy with Ginger Aromatherapy on Reducing Cholesterol Level among Patients with Hypercholesterolemia published in International Journal of Nursing and Health Services in Feb 2021 concludes: The intervention group received the cupping therapy with ginger aromatherapy while the control group only received 10 gr simvastatin drug per day. The result showed a significant difference between the experimental group and the control group. Cupping therapy with ginger aromatherapy for 21 days was effective in reducing lipid profile levels among hypercholesterolemia patients.

7. A study, titled Effect of dry cupping versus soft and prolonged massage (with Chamomile oil ) in the management of knee osteoarthritis—a randomized controlled clinical trial, published in J Complement Integr Med in 2021 concludes:  Soft and prolonged massage with chamomile oil and dry cupping both were found safe and effective in the management of osteoarthritis. 

8.  A study titled Effects of ear acupuncture combined with cupping therapy on severity and threshold of chronic back pain and physical disability: a randomized clinical trial ,published in Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine in July 2021 concludes: pain severity, pressure pain threshold, and physical disability improved over time in both groups. However, for the patents being treated with both ear acupuncture and cupping therapy, significant changes were seen in pain severity, pain relief, and physical disabilities between the initial and final sessions. For the “ear acupuncture and cupping therapy” group, significant changes were also seen for pain relief and physical disability in the follow up session (7 days after treatment).

Here is some of the information I recently shared in the July newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This newsletter is focused on chronic pain. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, which include links to the studies as well as special offers and sales coupons, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Sleep disturbances and pain outcomes in veterans
  2. Acupuncture effects on Fibromyalgia
  3. Cryotherapy for chronic pain
  4. Underwater exercise effects on postmenopausal Fibromyalgia symptoms
  5. Cryotherapy alleviates symptoms in chronic pelvic pain
  6. Effects of hydrotherapy on chronic lumbar pain
  7. Effectiveness of serial whole-body cryotherapy in Fibromyalgia
  8. Comparison of muscle conduction abnormality in Fibromylagia and chronic fatigue
  9. Efficacy of Vitamin D3 treatment for Fibromylagia
  10. COmparison of Prolotherapy and facet joint injection for chronic low back pain

STUDIES and ARTICLES

1. An article titled The influence of sleep disturbances and sleep disorders on pain outcomes among veterans: A systematic scoping review, published in Sleep Medicine Reviews in April 2021 concludes: Sleep disturbances and sleep disorders were associated with worse pain outcomes among veterans with chronic pain. Treatment-induced sleep improvements ameliorated pain outcomes in veterans with sleep disorders and sleep disturbances.

2.  An article titled Greater somatosensory afferent with acupuncture increases primary somatosensory connectivity and alleviates Fibromyalgia pain via insular y-aminobutyric acid: A randomized neuroimaging trial published in Arthritis & Rheumatology in December 2020 concludes:  Fibromyalgia patients who received electroacupuncture therapy experienced a greater reduction in pain severity compared to patients who received mock laser acupuncture.

3. An article titled Use of cryotherapy for managing chronic pain: An evidence-based narrative, published in Pain and Therapy in Dec 2020, concludes:  Both local (ice packs) and non-local (partial and whole body cryotherapy) show promise in reducing chronic pain associated with various chronic diseases including those of rheumatic and degenerative origin. Cryotherapy appears to be a safe therapy in carefully selected patients with only minimal adverse effects reported in the literature.

4. A study titled Effect of underwater exercises on treating postmenopausal Fibromyalgia symptoms, published in European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine in Sept 2020 concludes: underwater exercises are very effective in treating Fibromyalgia postmenopausal symptoms.

5. A study titled Cryotherapy alleviates symptoms in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome published in Andrologia in Dec 2020 concludes: cryotherapy could alleviate voiding symptoms, ameliorate pain and improve the quality of life in people with CP/CPPS.

6. A study titled Effect of Hydrotherapy on chronic pain in the lumbar region published in Journal of IMAB in Oct 2020 found: physiotherapy includes hydrotherapy with a water temperature of 36-37 C and magnetotherapy with a duration of 30-35 minutes treatment of the paravertebral muscle in the lumbar region, gluteus and lower limbs for 3 times a week for 1 month resulting in a reduction of the neurological and pain symptoms and the restoration of neurodynamics of n.ischiadicus.

7. A study, titled Serial whole-body cryotherapy in Fibromyalgia is effective and alters cytokine profiles, published in Advances in Rheumatology in January 2021 concludes: Whole body cryotherapy is effective in FM and reduces the burden of disease. The effects of serial WBC are strongest during application and are diminished 3 months after WBC treatment.

8.  A study titled Chronic fatigue syndrome: Abnormally fast muscle fiber conduction in the membranes of motor units at low static force load, published in Clinical Neurophysiology in Apr 2021 concludes: in chronic fatigue patients, muscle conduction increases abnormally with force, surface EMG can elicit abnormalities in both Fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue, and the surface EMG abnormalities in Fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue differ.

9. A study titled Efficacy and safety of weekly vitamin D3 in patients with Fibromyalgia: 12-week, double-blind, randomized, controlled placebo trial, published in Clinical Rheumatology in Feb 2021, concludes: there is no evidence of a trend in favor of vitamin D treatment, since we did not observe improvement in the VAS of pain or FIQ.

10.  A study titled Comparison of the effectiveness of Prolotherapy and facet joint injection in the treatment of chronic low back pain: a retrospective study, published in Turkiye Klinkeri Journal of Medical Sciences in Jan 2021 concludes: facet joint injection is considered more effective at relieving symptoms of back pain early in the condition, but Prolotherapy provided more benefit, according to long-term VAS scores.

© 2020 Advanced Holistic Healing Arts 
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