Here is some of the information I recently shared in my July newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This month is focused on neck pain and injuries. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Pillow preferences of people with neck pain and known spinal degeneration
  2. Prevalence of neck pain among dentists
  3. Effect of isometric exercises on pain and disability in patients with chronic neck pain
  4. Effects of thoracic mobility exercise on cervico-thoracic function, posture and pain
  5. Short-term effects of kinesiology taping in the treatment of latent and active upper trapezius trigger points
  6. Effect of kinesiology taping and posture stabilizing exercise on pain, craniovertebral angle, proprioception in adults with forward head posture
  7. Neck muscle activation and head kinematics when using a smartphone while walking
  8. Adding temperomandibular joint treatments to routine physiotherapy for patients with non-specific chronic neck pain
  9. The relationship between forward head posture and neck pain
  10. Effect of dry needling injection and kinesiotaping on pain and quality of life in patients with mechanical neck pain

STUDIES and ARTICLES

I receive a weekly update on anything published anywhere on the internet that includes information about neck pain, injuries, and treatments.  I try to glean the best of the information and provide a brief synopsis of the information. If you come across any information that you think would be good to share, please also feel free to pass that information along to: info@holistichealingarts.net


1. A study titled Pillow preferences of people with neck pain and known spinal degeneration: a pilot randomized controlled trial, published in European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine in Sep 2019, enrolled 117 people. Each tested latex pillows polyester pillows and their usual pillow for 28 days.  The polyester pillow significantly increased side flexion on waking. The latex pillow did not perform well on any outcome measure.

2.  An article titled Prevalence of neck pain among dentists, published in Drug Invention Today in Aug 2019 indicates that 56% of dentists surveyed suffered from neck pain for 10-15 years. The study concluded that the majority of dental practitioners acquired the development of cervical spondylosis.

3.  A study titled Effect of isometric exercises on pain and disability in patients with chronic neck pain, published in the European Journal of Physical Education and Sport Science in 2019, concluded: our study showed that physical therapy and neck isometric exercises and cervical joint opening exercises together with stretching exercises of back extensors were effective in chronic neck pain.

4.  A study titled Effects of Thoracic Mobility Exercise on Cervicothoracic Function, Posture, and Pain in Individuals with Mechanical Neck Pain, published in Physical Therapy Korea in Sept 2019 focused on “individuals with mechanical neck pain showing biomechanical and neurophysiological changes, including cervical spine muscle weakness. As a result of deep muscle weakness, it causes stability disability and reduced upper thoracic spine mobility, which finally leads to functional movement restriction such as limited range of motion and dysfunction." Conclusion: Thoracic mobility exercises during 6 weeks might be an effective intervention to improve the functional level, posture feature, and QVAS pain rating for managing individuals with mechanical neck pain.

5.  A study titled Short-term effects of kinesiology taping in the treatment of latent and active upper trapezius trigger points: two prospective, randomized, sham-controlled trials, published in Scientific Report in Oct 2019, concluded: results of this study do not support the use of the space correction KT technique to treat patients with latent or active myofascial trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle.

6.  A study titled Effect of Kinesiology taping and posture stabilizing exercise on pain, cranio-vertebral angle, proprioception in adults with forward head posture, published in the Journal of International Academy of Physical Therapy Research in 2019, concluded: the application of posture setting exercise could decrease pain, proprioceptive error and increase craniovertebral angle on forward head posture.

7.  A study, titled  Neck muscle activation and head kinematics when using a smartphone while walking, published in Sage Journals in Nov 2019 evaluated the neck muscular load of smartphone use while walking. The results indicate two-handed texting while walking poses a larger muscular load to the neck extensor muscles compared to when conducting one-handed browsing while walking due to the larger head tilt angle. 

8.  A study titled Adding Temperomandibular joint treatments to routine physiotherapy for patients with non-specific chronic neck pain: a randomized clinical study, published in the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies in April 2020 concluded: adding treatments of TMJ to routine neck physiotherapy can magnify the effect of the intervention, a significant change still in evidence at follow up.

9.  A study titled The relationship between forward head posture and neck pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis, published at SpringerLink in Nov 2019 concluded: adults with neck pain show increased forward head posture when compared to asymptomatic adults and that forward head posture is significantly correlated with neck pain measures in adults and older adults. No association was found between forward head posture and most of neck pain measures in adolescents.

10.  A study titled Effect of Dry Needling Injection and Kinesiotaping on Pain and Quality of Life in Patients with Mechanical Neck Pain, published in Pain Physician in Oct 2019, concluded: both methods were found to be effective on pain, mood, and quality of life and Kinesiotaping was found to be superior to dry needling in Mechanical neck pain in terms of increasing ROM and decreasing disability.

 

Here is some of the information I recently shared in a July newsletter. This newsletter is focused on licensing information, especially for those in Texas.  If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

Guidelines and Resources

1. Governor Abbott lifted the restriction on providing massage on May 22. At that time, he issued a document called OpenTexas which included a checklist of actions to take to open safely. To determine what actions you might need to take, this document will answer many of them.

2. The CDC has created information titled Interim U.S. Guidance for Risk Assessment and Work Restrictions for Healthcare Personnel with Potential Exposure to COVID-19 which is updated regularly. This document includes precautions for those who may have been exposed to someone with COVID-19 and what actions to take if you have been.

3. OSHA created a chart to explain what work environment is considered high risk of exposure, medium risk of exposure, and low risk of exposure. Massage is considered Medium Risk of exposure. The chart is part of the Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19.

4. The Healing Cocoon and Massage Therapy Radio brought together  3 leaders in the field of massage--Ruth Werner, Diana Thompson, and Melanie Hayden to discuss the implication of COVID-19 on massage practices. The discussion is about 90 minutes in length and includes very researched, up-to-date, and valid information. The video, A discussion on the potential changes coming due to COVID 19 to the massage/bodywork professions can be found on youtube.

5. Erin Bromage wrote a wonderful, easy to understand explanation of COVID-19, The Risks-Know-Them-Avoid Them,  that made national news. You can find the article on her blogpage.

Here is some of the information I recently shared in my May newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This month is focused on the shoulders and rotator cuffs. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

NOTE:  This will be the final newsletter about Shoulders and Rotator cuffs.  I want to thank each of you for your interest in receiving the newsletters. I know many of you are also receiving some of my other newsletters and those newsletter will continue. If you are not receiving the other newsletters and would be interested, please let me know to add you to the list:  chronic pain & Fibromyalgia, upper cross and neck, foot & ankle problems, PTSD & trauma, fascia & trigger points, lymph & lymph drainage, cupping, aromatherapy.

STUDIES and ARTICLES

I receive a weekly update on anything published anywhere on the internet that includes information about shoulder and rotator cuff injuries and treatments.  I try to glean the best of the information and provide a brief synopsis of the information. If you come across any information that you think would be good to share, please also feel free to pass that information along to: info@holistichealingarts.net


1. Whitney Lowe, on his website for Academy of Clinical Massage, posted a great article titled Hooked on Shoulder Pain which provides an excellent discussion of the subacromial space and impingement.

2.  A study, titled Distorted distance perception to reachable points in people with chronic shoulder pain, published in Musculoskeletal Science and Practice in July 2019, suggested: this study aimed to investigate whether people with chronic shoulder pain show perceptual distortions of space and body that may promote protective behavior and concluded: results suggest that distorted perception is not a typical consequence of chronic shoulder pain, however, that it may occur in cases where pain is strongly linked to movement.

3.  A study, titled Vibration as an adjunct to exercise: its impact on shoulder muscle activation, published in European Journal of Applied Physiology in May 2019, concluded: the use of vibration as an adjunct to exercise provokes a near-global increase in shoulder muscle activation level. Furthermore, exposure to vibration alters muscular recruitment improving readiness for movement.

4.  A study, titled Degenerative rotator cuff tears are associated with a low Omega-3 Index, published in Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids in Sept 2019, concluded: Patients with full-thickness degenerative rotator cuff tears had a significantly lower Omega-3 Index than controls without rotator cuff tendinopathy. Whether a lower Omega-3 Index represents an independent risk factor for degenerative rotator cuff tears should be further investigated, e.g. in a longitudinal study.

5.  A study, titled Association between physiological and subjective aspects of pain and disability in post-stroke patients with shoulder pain: a cross-sectional study, published in Journal of Clinical Medicine, in July 2019, concluded: Post-stroke patients showed a relationship between widespread pressure pain hypersensitivity with lower pressure pain threshold levels and pain disability perception, suggesting a central sensitization mediated by bilateral and symmetric pain patterns.

6.  A study, titled A randomized controlled trial of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the management of rotator cuff related shoulder pain published in the BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine concludes: Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids supplementation may have a modest effect on disability and pain outcomes in rotator cuff related shoulder pain.

7.  A study titled Effects of Wiper Exercise and External Rotation Exercise in Side-Lying on the muscle activity and thickness of the infraspinatus, published in the International Journal of Pharmaceutical Research in March 2019, concludes: This study recommends the wiper exercise is a good indication for the selective and functional strengthening of the infraspinatus muscle while minimizing the posterior deltoid for shoulder dysfunction.

8.  A study, titled Effects of Sling exercise with vibration on range of motion, muscle strength, pain, disability in patients with shoulder injuries, published in Physical Therapy Korea in Sept 2019, concludes: The sling exercise with local vibration of 50Hz affected the external rotation of the shoulder range of motion and improved shoulder flexor strength in the patients with shoulder injuries. Therefore, we propose the use of the sling exercise intervention with vibration in the exercise rehabilitation of patients with shoulder joint injuries.

9.  A study titled Effect of fatigue and the absence of visual feedback on shoulder motor control in a healthy population during a reaching task, published in Gait & Posture in October 2019, concludes: Muscle fatigue and lack of visual feedback can compromise shoulder kinematics; lack of visual feedback decreased reaching accuracy; lack of visual feedback increased time taken to complete the task; the addition of fatigue did not increase the effect of the lack of visual feedback.

1. TIDBITS and UPDATES Muscle Energy Technique for Subscapularis  Shared by Healthy Street on January 10
ASSESSMENT OF SUBSCAPULARIS
The therapist takes the patient's arm to 90 degrees of abduction and 90 degrees of elbow flexion – an assessment in this position is known as the 90/90 test. From this position, the therapist supports the patient's elbow with their right hand and the patient's forearm with their left hand. The therapist then takes the patient's arm into external rotation until a bind is felt. For normal range of motion of the subscapularis, the external rotation should achieve 90 degrees, i.e. the patient's forearm should be parallel to the couch. If there is shortness of the subscapularis, the range of motion will be less than 90 degrees.
MET TREATMENT OF SUBSCAPULARIS
PIR METHOD
The therapist takes the patient's shoulder into external rotation until a bind is felt. From the position of bind, the patient is asked to contract the subscapularis by internally rotating their shoulder. After 10 seconds and on the relaxation phase, the therapist applies traction to the shoulder joint (to prevent an impingement) and slowly encourages the shoulder into further external rotation.
RI METHOD
If the patient has discomfort activating the subscapularis, the antagonistic muscle of the infraspinatus can be activated instead. From the position of bind, the patient is asked to resist external rotation: this will contract the infraspinatus and allow the subscapularis to relax through RI. On the relaxation phase, a lengthening procedure of the subscapularis can then be performed.
🔑 The subscapularis is one of the rotator cuff muscles and is the main medial rotator of the glenohumeral joint. A subscapularis strain can result in referred pain to the area of the deltoid tuberosity.
Reference: MET John Gibbons 

Here is some of the information I recently shared in my June newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This month is focused on PTSD and trauma information. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

STUDIES and ARTICLES

I receive a weekly update on anything published anywhere on the internet that includes information about PTSD and trauma.  I try to glean the best of the information and provide a brief synopsis of the information. If you come across any information that you think would be good to share, please also feel free to pass that information along to: info@holistichealingarts.net


1. A powerful study titled Body-Oriented Therapy in Recovery from Child Sexual Abuse: An Efficacy Study, published in Altern Ther Health Med In July 2007 focused on the perceived influence on abuse recovery of body-oriented therapy. 24 adult females participated in a randomized study. Treatment consisted of 8 2 hour long massage sessions or 8 2 hour-long therapy sessions. The results suggest significant improvement on all outcome measures.

2.  An article, originally published in International Psychology Bulletin by Grant Rich, titled Massage Therapy for PTSD, Trauma, and Anxiety, gives numerous references to studies and metastudies on the effectiveness of massage for trauma, anxiety, and PTSD with a valuable reference list for the studies.

3.  A study titled Cortisone Decreases and Serotonin and Dopamine Increase Following Massage Therapy, published in 2005 in International Journal of Neuroscience, concludes: Significant decreases were noted in cortisol levels (averaging decreases 31%); the activating neurotransmitters (serotonin and dopamine) noted an average increase of 28% for serotonin and 31% for dopamine. This suggests the stress-affecting effect of massage therapy on a variety of medical conditions and stressful experiences (including PTSD) is beneficial.

4.  A study titled Alleviating post-traumatic stress in children following Hurricane Andrew, published in Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology in 1996, included 60 grade-school children who showed signs of severe post-traumatic stress. The children received massage on 8 days 1 month after the hurricane. The children reported being happier, less anxious, and had lower cortisol levels after therapy.

5.  A study in 2014 titled PTSD Symptom Reports of Patients Evaluated for the New Mexico Medical Cannabis Program, published in Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, concluded: Cannabis is associated with reductions in PTSD symptoms in some patients.

Here is some of the information I recently shared in my October newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This month is focused on the fascia, myofascia and trigger point information. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

STUDIES and ARTICLES

I receive a weekly update on anything published anywhere on the internet that includes information about fascia, myofascia and trigger points.  I try to glean the best of the information and provide a brief synopsis of the information. If you come across any information that you think would be good to share, please also feel free to pass that information along to: info@holistichealingarts.net


1. A blog article, titled Fascia Acts as a Second Nervous System, by Dr. Russell Schierling, offers several important concepts:

2.  A study, Effects of Local Ischemic Compression on Upper Limb Latent Myofascial Trigger Points: A Study of Subjective Pain and Linear Motor Performance concluded: the results suggest the Ischemic Compression effectiveness on pain and Motor Performance impairment in subjects with Latent TrPs. However, the Motor Performance of these patients is only partially improved after the Ischemic compression application.

3.  An article, titled Myofascial Pain Syndrome: Looked through the Lens of 11 Cases Managed by Myofascial Trigger Point Massage Therapy, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, published in International Journal of Medical and Pharmaceutical Case Reports, concludes: Myofascial pain syndrome linked with latent or active myofascial trigger points developed due to repeated strains and injuries needs to be diagnosed by history and palpation method, system evaluation and laboratory investigations. Though several interventions are used in myofascial pain syndrome, myofascial trigger point massage therapy alone is found to be reasonably effective with excellent results.

4.  A study, titled The Effect of Self-Myofascial release using tennis ball on pain in individuals with piriformis trigger points, published in International Journal of Basic and Applied Research, concludes: Subjects were asked to take small circular movements by sitting on a tennis ball under the buttocks for 60 seconds. The study concluded that Self-Myofascial Release using tennis ball helps in reducing pain and increasing the pain pressure threshold providing a simple yet effective alternative for piriformis trigger point pain.

5.  An abstract submitted for publication, titled AB0910 Effective restoring Motion and Effective Treatment of Myofascial and Neuropathic Low Back Pain by Targeted Dry Needling Using Ultrasound Guidance in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, concludes: Dry needling under ultrasound guidance effectively reduce myofascial pain ameliorate symptoms of neuropathy and local muscle hypo motility in low back pain.

6.  A study, titled Effects of Self-myofascial release using foam roller on range of motion and morphological changes in muscle: A crossover study, published in J Strength Cond Res. in May 2019, concludes: Self-myofascial release using foam roller is effective in improving range of motion in at least some conditions. However, its mechanism is still unclear.We hypothesized that the Foam Rolling intervention may increase ROM because of changes in fascicle length and aponeurosis displacement. Although ROM of both dorsiflexion and plantar flexion increased significantly after the Foam Rolling intervention (p<0,01), no significant differences were found in fascicle length and aponeurosis displacement before and after the foam rolling intervention.

7.  A case study, titled The effectiveness of positional release therapy in myofascial trigger points associated with recurrent lateral ankle sprain—a case study, published in World Journal of Pharmaceutical Research in Apr 2019, concludes: There was a significant decrease in the pain symptoms observed after the treatment, with the significant increase in Active ROM. It is concluded that Positional Release Therapy may be an effective treatment for pain and increase in Active ROM and pain decreased caused by trigger point due to recurrent lateral ankle sprain. (Peroneous muscles)

8.  An study titled, A study to compare the effect of muscle energy technique and positional release technique on pain and cervical ROM in patients with chronic upper trapezitis, published in International’Journal of Scientific Research, concludes: Muscle energy technique is an effective option in the treatment of chronic upper trapezitis.

9.  A study titled A comparative study to find out the immediate effect of occipital muscle inhibition and static hamstring stretching on hamstring tightness in young adults—an experimental study, published in International Journal of Scientific Research in May 2019, concludes: Both the techniques showed marked improvement in the outcome measure, but the occipital muscle inhibition is more effective for the hamstring tightness and it is easy to perform for the participants and it was observed that the effect was persistent for longer time.

1. VIDEOS
• A video titled Vancouver Fascia Congress Shoulder study: Myofascial Trigger point Release by Christopher Gordon, shows the results of a study of myofascial trigger point release on the elasticity and sensitization of the tissue.

BOOKS
Anatomy, Head and Neck, Deep Cervical Neck Fascia by Paul Sutcliffe and Savita Lasrado. Update Jun 2019 and found at StatPearls.

Anatomy, Abdomen and Pelvis, Femoral Triangle by Hayden Basinger and Jeffery P. Hogg. Update April 2091 and found at StatPearls

Here is some of the information I recently shared in a July newsletter. This newsletter is focused on licensing information, especially for those in Texas.  If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

Updates from Other States and Organizations that May Affect Texas

 

1. Gov. Ducey, of Arizona,  signed HB 2569 on April 10, 2019. The new law provides for recognition of licensed professionals. This means anyone holding a license from another state can move to Arizona and begin practicing in that licensed occupation.

“You must go through the process of application, background check (fingerprint), and license issued by the Arizona Massage Board which takes anywhere from five to eight weeks,” he said. “Any person practicing without a license can be found guilty of a misdemeanor and also be subject for review in front of the Arizona massage board, which has the authority to issue or not issue the license if the applicant has failed to meet the standards or violate the law, which can endanger the public.”

The ability to move to Arizona and practice in a licensed occupation will be available only to people from states that require them to hold a license.

The applicant has to have been licensed in another state or U.S. territory for at least two years of the last five years immediately preceding their application, or the applicant has to hold a current certification from the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (NCBTMB) “or another agency that meets the standards of the national organization.”

All massage applicants must submit to a fingerprint background check. If an applicant has worked as a massage therapist for less than two of the past five years immediately preceding their Arizona application, they must also submit educational transcripts.

2. NCBTMB ANNOUNCES NEW COMPETENCY-BASED BOARD CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS, REVISED EXAM.

To further align with healthcare professions and embrace similar competency-based criteria, NCBTMB announced the following new Board Certification requirements as of August 3, 2018:

Graduate from a NCBTMB Assigned School
Passing score on the NCBTMB Board Certification Exam
Pass a criminal background check (performed by NCBTMB)
Verification of current massage therapy state licensure
Agree to uphold NCBTMB’s Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice.

NCBTMB removed its previously mandated 750 hours of education and 250 hours of professional, hands-on work experience. ­­

Board Certification renewal requirements remain mainly unaffected. However, 100 hours of hands-on work experience is no longer required.

Texas Laws and Rules

1. HB 1865 removes the five-year license ineligibility provision for persons who have been convicted of, entered a plea of nolo contendere or guilt to, or received deferred adjudication for an offense under Chapter 20A or Subchapter A, Chapter 43 of the Penal Code. This part of the bill takes effect on September 1, 2019 and allows TDLR to assess each applicant’s fitness for licensure on a case-by-case basis.

2.  HB 1865 requires persons who apply for an initial license on or after September 1, 2019 to submit fingerprints for the purposes of obtaining criminal history information. All licensees must comply with the fingerprint requirement no later than September 1, 2021.

3. HB 1865 requires students who are enrolled in a massage school on or after June 1, 2020 to hold a student permit.

4. HB 1865 also requires massage schools to maintain a monthly progress report regarding attendance for students and to notify TDLR when a student is eligible to take the examination. Massage school reporting requirements go into effect on July 1, 2020

5. HB 2747 prohibits any individual, including a student, license holder, or employee, from residing on the premises of a massage establishment after September 1, 2019.

6.  HB 2747 requires licensed massage therapists to attach their photograph to the front of their posted license no later than January 1, 2020.

7.  HB 2747 also requires massage establishments and schools to display a sign concerning the services and assistance available to victims of human trafficking no later than April 1, 2020.

Other Laws not specific to Massage

1.  Senate Bill (SB) 37 removes authority for a licensing agency to take disciplinary action against an applicant or licensee, including refusal to issue or renew an occupational license, based on the person’s default on a student loan or breach of a student loan repayment contract or scholarship contract. The bill went into effect on June 7, 2019.

2.  HB 2452 also allows TDLR to accept anonymous complaints. The bill went into effect on May 29, 2019.

© 2020 Advanced Holistic Healing Arts 
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