Here is some of the information I recently shared in the April newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This newsletter is focused on foot and ankle pain and plantar fasciitis. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, which include links to the studies as well as special offers and sales coupons, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Increasing ankle dorsiflexion range of motion
  2. Comparing Active release and Positional release for Gastrosoleus trigger point release
  3. Correlation between Gastrocnemius tightness and heel pain
  4. Effect of upward toe springs on walking biomechanics
  5. Comparing Botulinum Toxin A, Corticosteroid, and anesthetic injection for plantar fasciitis
  6. Effect of foam roller on pain and ankle range of motion
  7. Comparing adjuvant low-dye kinesio taping, sham taping, or extracorporeal shockwave therapy
  8. Comparing muscle energy technique versus ischemic compression on pain and disability
  9. Effect of myofascial release with lower limb strengthening on plantar fasciitis
  10. Dry needling effectiveness for plantar heel pain
  11.  Exploration of Valgus, Varus, Vargus

STUDIES and ARTICLES

1. An article titled Strategies to increase ankle dorsiflexion range of motion by Drs. Howe, Waldron, North, and Bampouras reviews exercise-based strategies to restore ankle dorsiflexion range of motion.

2.  A study titled Comparison of Active Release Technique and Positional Release Therapy for Gastrosoleus Trigger Point Release in Recreational Runners, published in International Journal of Health Sciences and Research in July 2020, concludes: Positional Release Therapy is a better intervention for the release of trigger points as it shows a greater increase in ankle dorsiflexion range of motion and a significant reduction in pain.

3. A study titled Correlation Between Gastrocnemius Tightness and Heel Pain Severity in Plantar Fasciitis, published in Foot & Ankle International in Sept 2020 concludes: a strong, statistically significant correlation between gastrocnemius tightness and the severity of heel pain in plantar fasciitis.

4. An intriguing study titled Effect of the upward curvature of toe springs on walking biomechanics in humans, published in Scientific Reports in Sept 2020 found: although most features of modern footwear have been intensively studied, there has been almost no research on the effects of toe springs. This nearly ubiquitous upward curvature of the sole at the front of the shoe elevates the toe box dorsally above the ground and thereby holds the toes in a constantly dorsiflexed  position. While it is generally recognized that toe springs facilitate the forefoot’s ability to roll forward at the end of stance, toe springs may also have some effect on natural foot function. Our results help explain why toe springs have been a pervading feature in shoes for centuries but also suggest that toe springs may contribute to weakening of the foot muscles and possibly to increased susceptibility to common pathological conditions such as plantar fasciitis. 

5. A study titled Comparison of Botulinum Toxin A, Corticosteroid, and Anesthetic Injection for Plantar Fasciitis, published in Foot & Ankle International, concluded: no significant differences between treatment groups were observed. The pain relief and functional improvement obtained with the different treatments was maintained during the 6-month follow-up.

6. A study. titled Immediate effect of foam roller on pain and ankle range of motion in patients with plantar fasciitis: A randomized controlled trial, published in Hong Kong Physiotherapy Journal in Oct 2020, concluded: both stretching and foam rolling techniques helped in reducing pain and increasing the ROM. However, the effectiveness of foam roller was superior to stretching in terms of increase in pressure pain thresholds at gastrocnemius and soleus.

7. A study titled Effects of Adjuvant Low-dye kinesio taping, adjuvant sham taping, or extracorporeal shockwave therapy alone in plantar fasciitis: a randomized double-blind controlled trial, published in Europe PMC in Nov 2020, concludes: Low-dye KT, in addition to ESWT is more effective than sham-taping and ESWT in pain relief and foot function improvement at a 4-week follow-up.

8.  A study titled Effect of muscle energy technique versus ischemic compression on pain and disability in patients with plantar fasciitis, published in International Journal of Physiology, Nutrition and Physical Education in 2020 concluded:  both the muscle energy technique and ischemic compression were individually effective in improving the flexibility and strength. While comparing both techniques there is no significant difference present between the groups.

9. A study titled Effect of myofascial release with lower limb strengthening on plantar fasciitis, published in International Journal of Physical Education, Sports and Health in 2021 concludes: myofascial release is significantly effective when given with lower limb strengthening programs for reducing pain and improving the functional status in subjects with plantar fasciitis.

10. A study titled Is Dry Needling effective for the management of plantar heel pain or plantar fasciitis? An updated systematic review and meta-analysis published in Pain Medicine in Mar 2021 concluded: moderate to low evidence suggests a positive effect of TrP dry needling for improving pain intensity and pain-related disability in patients with plantar heel pain of musculoskeletal origin at short- and long-term, respectively.

TIDBITS and RESOURCES

REFERENCE

A great article, by Whitney Lowe, titled Valgus, Varus, Vargus…What is it? in Nov 2015, covers a very understandable definition of these joint dysfunctions and what they can cause.

Here is some of the information I recently shared in my October newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This month is focused on fascia, myofascia, and trigger points. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Why we don't elongate fascia
  2. New scientific data about active trigger points
  3. Myofascial release enhances wound healing
  4. Fascia microtrauma may contribute to DOMS
  5. Attenuation of postoperative adhesions using manual therapy
  6. Iliotibial band pain in the runner
  7. Effects of C-section and vaginal delivery on abdominal muscles and fascia
  8. Comparison of Neuromuscular inhibition and ischemic compression
  9. Comparison of 3 different manual therapeutic techniques
  10. Comparison of Active Release technique vs Positional release for trigger points

RESOURCES

  1. VIDEO: The Secret Life of fascia official trailer
  2. VIDEO: What is fascia?
  3. BOOK: Fascia: What it is and why it matters
  4. BOOK: Anatomy, Bony pelvis, and lower limb fascia lata

STUDIES and ARTICLES

I receive a weekly update on anything published on the internet that includes information about fascia, myofascia, manual therapy, and trigger points.  I try to glean the best of the information and provide a brief synopsis of the information. If you come across any information that you think would be good to share, please also feel free to pass that information along to: info@holistichealingarts.net


1. A blog article, titled Why We Don’t Elongate Facia (pt 2) by Whitney Lowe investigates the idea of fascial manipulation focusing on the force applied to the skin to create an effect on fascia.

2.  A blog article, titled New Scientific Data to Revisit Active Trigger Points Concept by Ross Turchaninov includes images of trigger points and some additional theories.

3. A blog article, titled Modeled Myofascial Release Enhances Wound Healing in Bioengineered Tendons through Fibroblast Proliferation and Collagen Remodeling on Fascia & Fitness summarizes a study published in Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics and suggests that “MFR results in improved wound healing due to increased fibroblast deposition and collagen density within and adjacent to the wound area.”

4. A blog article titled Fascia micro-trauma may contribute to DOMS on Fascia & Fitness show that DOMS was associated with the increased sensitivity of muscle fascia to the stimulus, suggesting the source of pain is fascia (connective tissue) rather than the muscle fibers themselves.

5. A study titled Attenuation of postoperative adhesions using a modeled manual therapy, published at PLOS ONE in 2017 concludes: Modeled Manual Therapy initiated immediately postoperatively is an effective preventive for cohesive postoperative adhesions and includes a video of the technique performed.

6. A blog article titled Iliotibial Band Pain in the Runner Part 2: Treatment by Rich Willy suggests: Foam rolling does not result in changes in flexibility that last more than just a few minutes and any pain relief experienced by foam rolling is temporary, likely due to temporary central pain modulation. Contrary to popular opinion, “adhesions” or “myofasciae” are not being “released” or “broken up” by foam rolling. Considering ITB pain is a compression injury, it makes little sense to add further compression o the lateral knee anyway. Instead of foam rolling, purposively target running-specific loads.

7. A study, titled Effects of Cesarean Section and Vaginal Delivery on Abdominal Muscles and Fasciae, published in Medicina Apr 2020 concludes: transverse Cesarean Section women showed significant alterations in both abdominal fasciae and muscle thicknesses, whereas vaginal delivery women showed alterations mainly in muscles. Thinner Rectus abdominus and/or dissymmetric Internal oblique, wider inter-rectus distance, and thicker loose connective tissue and abdominal perimuscular fasciae after Cesarean section may cause muscle deficits and alteration of fascial gliding, which may induce scar, abdominal, low back, and/or pelvic pain.

8. A study titled, Effect of Integrated Neuromuscular Inhibition Technique versus Ischaemic Compression and Trigger Point Pressure Release on Upper Trapezius and Non-Specific Neck Pain in IOSR Journal of Nursing and Health Science, 2019 concludes: Integrated neuromuscular inhibition technique and ischemic compression and trigger point pressure release are equally effective in reducing pain and neck disability index and improving range of motion.

9. A study titled Change in hamstrings flexibility: A comparison between three different manual therapeutic techniques in normal individuals, published in Adesh University Journal of Medical Sciences & Research in 2020 compared post isometric relaxation, maximum voluntary isometric contraction and PNF hold relax techniques to increase the flexibility of hamstring muscles. Conclusion: Maximum voluntary isometric contraction was the most effective among the three, although all groups showed a significant increase in active knee extension ROM.

10. A study titled Comparison of Active Release Technique and Positional Release Therapy for Gastrosoleus Trigger Point Release in Recreational Runners, published in International Journal of Health Sciences and Research in Jul 2020, concludes: Positional Release Therapy is a better intervention for the release of trigger points as it shows a greater increase in ankle dorsiflexion range of motion and significant reduction in pain.

VIDEOS

  1. A video titled The Secret Life of Fascia: Official Trailer gives some great visual info about fascia. There is also a link to rent or purchase the video on the page.
  2. A video titled Fascia: What is fascia? New research changes the way we look at pain is a brief history of research that supports the importance of fascia.

BOOKS

  1. Fascia: What it is and Why it Matters by David Lesondak (you can download the pdf). In addition, you can watch an interview the author about the book or download an audio podcast of the webinar
  2. Book abstract: Anatomy, Bony Pelvis and Lower Limb, Fascia Lata from StatPearls Publishing, Jun 2020 gives a wonderful review of all the structures of the pelvis and lower limb and how they relate to each other.

 

Here is some of the information I recently shared in my September newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This month is focused on foot and ankle problems. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Manual therapy interventions in the treatment of plantar fasciitis--three approaches
  2. Medical Massage vs Secondarily developed plantar fasciitis
  3. The effect of high-intensity laser therapy in the management of painful calcaneal spur
  4. Extracorporeal shockwaves treatment for plantar fasciitis
  5. Effectiveness of customized insoles in patients with Morton's neuroma
  6. Manual therapy interventions in the treatment of plantar fasciitis: 3 approaches
  7. Effects of plantar intrinsic foot muscle strengthening exercise on static and dynamic foot kinematics in pes planus
  8. Outcomes of ultrasound-guided gastrocnemius injection with Botulinum toxin for chronic plantar fasciitis
  9. Can an insole for obese individuals maintain the arch of the foot against repeated hyper loading?
  10. Graston Technique® as a treatment for patients with chronic plantar heel pain

TIDBITS

  1. Athletic Taping for Pes Planus and Plantar fasciitis
  2. Flexor Hallucis Longus anatomy and pathology review
  3. Ballet Foot "En Pointe"
  4. When you stop moving 66 joints in your body
  5. Grandmaster Yang Jun lecture on "bubbling well"

STUDIES and ARTICLES

I receive a weekly update on anything published on the internet that includes information about foot and ankle problems and treatments.  I try to glean the best of the information and provide a brief synopsis of the information. If you come across any information that you think would be good to share, please also feel free to pass that information along to: info@holistichealingarts.net


1. A study titled Manual therapy interventions in the treatment of plantar fasciitis: A comparison of three approaches, published in Health SA in Sept 2019 focused on comparing: 1) manipulation of the foot and ankle plus cross friction massage of the plantar fascia, 2) cross friction massage of the plantar fascia and gastroc-soleus complex stretching, and 3) a combination of both protocols. Conclusion: all three protocols had a positive effect on the ROM and pain perception for patients with plantar fasciitis.

2.  A case study titled Medical Massage vs Secondarily Developed Plantar Fasciitis, published in Journal of Massage Science in their blog by Dr. Ross Turchaninov gives a wonderful example of how plantar fasciitis pain could be attributed to other causes and linger after treatment.

3. A study titled The effect of high-intensity laser therapy in the management of painful calcaneal spur: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, published in Lasers in Medical Science at SpringerLink in Sept 2019 focused on hight intensity laser therapy plus exercise versus placebo high-intensity laser therapy plus exercise. Conclusion: No superiority of High-intensity Laser Therapy over placebo.

4. A case study analysis titled Extracorporeal shockwaves treatment for plantar fasciitis, published in Eur J Transl Myol in 2019 concludes: The application of ESWT in the insertional site of the plantar fascia alone can heal the local impairment but may not be sufficient to solve the primary cause of plantar fasciitis and may expose the patient to risk of recurrence…the application of shockwaves in the impaired myofascial points of the leg and pelvis aimed at restoring the sliding properties and the equilibrium in the myofascial system of the entire lower limb in order to return the correct function of the plantar fascia without treating the plantar fascia itself which is often found to be inflamed and painful.

5. A study article, titled Effectiveness of customized insoles in patients with Morton’s Neuroma: a randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial, published in Clinical Rehabilitation in Sept 2019, concludes: The study demonstrated that customized insole with metatarsal and arch support relieved walking pain and improved patient-reported measures of function in patients with Morton’s neuroma.

6. A study titled Manual therapy interventions in the treatment of plantar fasciitis: a comparison of three approaches, published in Health SA Gesondheid in 2019 compared 1) mobilization and manipulation of the ankle and foot with cross friction of plantar fascia, 2) stretching of gastroc-soleus complex and cross friction of plantar fascia, and 3) combination of both protocols. Conclusion: all three of the approaches utilized have a beneficial effect in patients with plantar fasciitis. The use of manipulation seems to increase plantar flexion, while passive stretching increases ROM and decreases pain.

7. A study titled Effects of plantar intrinsic foot muscle strengthening exercise on static and dynamic foot kinematics: a pilot randomized controlled single-blind trial in individuals with pes planus, published in Gait and Posture In Jan 2020, concluded: For individuals with pes planus, the short-foot exercise effectively corrected static foot alignment and temporal parameters of foot kinematics during gait. Short-foot exercise might effectively prevent or treat injuries related to the pes planus alignment.

8. A study titled Outcomes of Ultrasound-guided gastrocnemius injection with Botulinum toxin for chronic plantar fasciitis, published in Foot and Ankle International in Oct 2019 concludes: the use of Botulinum Toxin A had a positive effect on improvement in pain and foot function 1 year after treatment.

9. A study titled Can an insole for obese individuals maintain the arch of the foot against repeated hyper loading? published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders in Oct 2019 concludes: Use of insoles for obese individuals may help to slow time-dependent foot structural changes. However, the effect was not enough to maintain the foot structure against repeated hyper loadings.

10. A study titled Graston Technique® as a treatment for patients with chronic plantar heel pain, published in Clinical Practice in Athletic Training in 2019, concludes: Participants improved in variables measured over a six-week treatment of GT. This was both shown to be not only statistically significant but clinically significant utilizing minimal important difference.

TIDBIT

  1. Short video from ConEd Institute Athletic Taping application for a Plantar Fasciitis or a Pes Planus
  2. A good anatomy and pathology review of the Flexor Hallucis Longus by Whitney Lowe can be found on his Academy of Clinical Massage website.
  3. Ballet Foot "En Pointe" 
  4. Per Michael McAleese: When you stop 66 joints in your body from moving, for example by wearing tight or rigid shoes, you are found to create problems. Joints are made to move—the foot has 33 joints, so get your shoes off and let them move.
  5. Grandmaster Yang Jun shared at his lecture: It is important to understand your whole foot takes weight. If you cannot pick up your toes without shifting your weight and if you cannot pick up your heels without shifting your weight, you are placing your weight into the correct area of your feet. Also notice: when your weight is placed into the bubbling well, you will have a natural and comfortable feeling in your abdomen. Physical balance and ease of breathing go together.” 

 

Here is some of the information I recently shared in my November newsletter. Each newsletter has a specific focus.  This month is focused on foot and ankle information. If you would be interested in receiving my newsletters, please head over to my contact page and sign up.

STUDIES, ARTICLES, and RESOURCES

I receive a weekly update on anything published anywhere on the internet that includes information about feet and ankles.  I try to glean the best of the information and provide a brief synopsis of the information. If you come across any information that you think would be good to share, please also feel free to pass that information along to: info@holistichealingarts.net


1. A study titled “Spinal and Peripheral dry needling versus peripheral dry needling alone among individuals with a history of lateral ankle pain: a randomized controlled trial”, published in Int J Sports Phys Ther in Dec 2017, suggests: Dry needling of the multifidi in addition to fibularis muscles does not result in improvement in strength, unilateral balance or unilateral hop test performance, compared to Dry Needling the fibularis muscles alone among individuals with a history of ankle sprain.

2. A study titled “Dry cupping for plantar fasciitis: a randomized controlled trial”, published in J Phys Ther Sci in May 2017, concludes: The data indicated that both dry cupping therapy and electrical stimulation therapy could reduce pain and increase function significantly in the population tested…There was no significant difference between the dry cupping therapy and electrical stimulation groups in all the outcome measurements. These results support that both dry cupping therapy and electrical stimulation therapy could reduce pain and increase function in the population tested.

3. A study titled “Effectiveness of Myofascial Release in Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis: A RCT”, published in Indian Journal of Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy, concludes: Conservative treatment approach like physiotherapy in the treatment of plantar fasciitis, is beneficial, although both the conventional treatment and myofascial release have found to be effective in alleviation of symptoms and associated disability in plantar fasciitis. However, the subjects treated with myofascial release showed an additional benefit in terms of reduction of pain on VAs and functional ability in terms of FFI. Hence it can be concluded that myofascial release is an effective therapeutic option in the treatment of plantar fasciitis.  

4. Whitney Lowe’s article, Understanding Overpronation, in Massage Today in Jan 2007, gives a very good explanation of what overpronation is and the problems it can cause.

5. A study article, titled Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome: Muscles Located at the Site of Pain, published in Scientifica (Cairo) in Mar 2016, concludes: The soles and flexor digitorum longus muscless were observed to attach directly to the posteromedial border of the tibia. The tibias posterior muscle had no attachment to this site. Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that if traction is the cause of MTSS then soleus and the flexor digitorum muscles and not the tibias posterior muscles are the likely cause of MTSS. 

6. A study. titled “Ischemic compression and joint mobilizations or the treatment of nonspecific myofascial foot pain: findings from two quasi-experimental before-and-after studies”, published Mar 2015 in J Can Chiropr Assoc concludes:  Preliminary evidence that myofascial therapy consisting of ischemic compressions and joint mobilizations may reduce the symptoms of patients suffering from chronic non-specific foot pain….Combined treatment involving ischemic compression and joint mobilization for chronic foot pain is associated with significant improvements in functional and self-perceived improvement immediately and at up to six months post-treatment.

7. A video, Metatarsal Mobilization by Whitney Lowe suggests a treatment for a common nerve entrapment problem, Morton’s neuron. The video can be found on ABMP’s facebook page.

8. A study, “Effects of myofascial trigger point release in plantar fasciitis for pain management", published in J Med Sci in 2018, concluded: myofascial trigger point technique was seen effective in relation to improved pain in patients of plantar fasciitis.

VIDEOS

2.  Miscellaneous

1. From Gary Ward:  The Great Hallux (a small rant)
2.  Per Michael McAleese:  We can not keep changing the shape of our feet and expecting our feet to function like feet .. as always it is your choice
© 2020 Advanced Holistic Healing Arts 
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